Filial Duty
Original Airdate: December 2, 1985

[Kellys' apartment]

(Forensics, a police photographer and a Medical Examiner, Nussbaum, are at a crime scene)
NUSSBAUM: Some time last night. I'll be able to give you more details after I do the autopsy. Assuming I live that long.
CHRISTINE: I beg your pardon?
NUSSBAUM: Breakfast.
CHRISTINE: What?!
NUSSBAUM: I didn't have any! And they expect me to look at a dozen fresh ones and a few not so fresh ones before lunch! Ha! Do you know what that's like?!
CHRISTINE: Hey, Nussbaum, excuse me, about the victim?
NUSSBAUM: OK, boys, we're done. You can take her downtown. (to Chris) Early wake up. Short staffed. I'll be lucky if I get a candy bar between courses.
CHRISTINE: You seem very sensitive, Nussbaum, but right now I'm trying to conduct an investigation here.
NUSSBAUM: Oh, sure. That's easy for you. You've probably had breakfast.
CHRISTINE: (as Nussbaum walks out) Would you give me a break?
NUSSBAUM: You wanna a break?! Try eating liver paté when you're cutting a jumper.
CHRISTINE: Nussbaum. Please. Probable cause of death?
NUSSBAUM: No!
CHRISTINE: Well, the woman was found with an electrical cord tied around her neck. Now, is it safe to assume strangulation?
NUSSBAUM: I'll try to have a preliminary report for you by tomorrow morning. But I can't promise!
CHRISTINE: Tomorrow? No! (following him) No. You can get it for me by this afternoon.
NUSSBAUM: This afternoon!! ...All right. All right, I'll do what I can. Do you know that deli downstairs? Are their bagels any good?
CHRISTINE: I wouldn't know.
NUSSBAUM: You know, if I put a move on, I might be able to grab some lunch and cream cheese before my first slice.
CHRISTINE: Bon appetit.
NUSSBAUM: (going out the door) Excellent.
CHRISTINE: Did you get anything?
MARY BETH: She was Mrs. Tatum O'Connell. She was Mrs. Kelly's mother. She was all alone last evening. It looks as like the perpetrator came up the fire escape and in the window.
CHRISTINE: Anything missing?
MARY BETH: Only from the bedroom. About three hundred dollars in cash and a gold necklace that was around her neck.
CHRISTINE: Any other members of the family?
MARY BETH: Yeah, they have a son, Frank Jr. He went to school already but the Uniforms are gonna pick him up.
CHRISTINE: Mr. and Mrs. Kelly, I realise how difficult this has been for you but we do have some more information that we must get from each of you.

[Manhattan street]

MARY BETH: Do you know what it sounds like? It sounds like Newman's cat burglar.
CHRISTINE: Possibly.
MARY BETH: It's a very similar MO, Christine.
CHRISTINE: It could have been someone who knew them. It could have been some other burglar.
MARY BETH: Well, according to the Forensics report, I'm telling you, it sounds like Newman's cat burglar.
CHRISTINE: And all I'm saying is, if Newman's cat burglar had committed every burglary that Newman tried to pin on him, the man could have retired years ago.
MARY BETH: You know, you're very competitive with this man.
CHRISTINE: I'm not! I'm simply not willing to turn over a case to some cock-sure rookie who thinks he knows it all. If you're tired and cranky, why don't you go on clerical?
MARY BETH: Oh don't start that again. I will stay on the streets as long as I want to. And it has nothing to do with your competition with Newman.
CHRISTINE: All right. I will wait until the Forensics report. I will wait to talk to the Uniforms until they have completed their interviews with the neighbours. And then, when I have all of the facts I will then make a reasoned assumption.
MARY BETH: Right. I agree with you a hundred percent, Christine. ...All I'm saying is it sounds like Newman's cat burglar.

[Samuels' office]

NEWMAN: It's only three blocks since his last case.
CHRISTINE: The one you're least sure he did.
NEWMAN: Everything follows his pattern. Entering from a fire escape. A rear apartment one floor down from the roof.
CORASSA: The hours he works. limiting it to cash and jewellery. Anybody else would have taken the TV set.
NEWMAN: It's obviously the same guy. Now I caught the original sixty-one. I put together the original pattern. Now I should catch the homicide.
CHRISTINE: (to Samuels) Only none of the others had a homicide!
NEWMAN: There's always a first time. He probably didn't even know about the old lady.
CORASSA: At her age she couldn't have gone out.
NEWMAN: So, when he saw her he just panicked.
CHRISTINE: What about the cold chisel?
NEWMAN: Exactly! The man always uses a cold chisel.
CHRISTINE: I checked the window. The instrument used was smaller than a cold chisel. I have called Forensics and the Forensics report will confirm, as soon as it arrives, the man used a screwdriver.
NEWMAN: Maybe he lost the chisel.
(Chris utters a small laugh and Mary Beth smiles)
SAMUELS: Well, I've got one other concern and I'm gonna have to be blunt. I've never had a situation like this before. Lacey.
MARY BETH: Yes sir.
SAMUELS: You know and I know that basically we have three days on a homicide. After that the solve rate drops down the garbage. Are you sure you're up for this?
MARY BETH: (as Chris turns to look at her) I'm fine, sir. Thank you, sir.
SAMUELS: All right. Sergeant Cagney, you're second whip. It's up to you. Make whatever decision you feel is appropriate.
CHRISTINE: Than you, Lieutenant. (she smiles at Newman) Gentlemen, after you.
(she gives Samuels a thumbs-up as she closes the door)

[Detectives' Squad room]

CHRISTINE: (reading from a notebook as Mary Beth types) Preliminary interviews. 'Neighbours in the building. No one saw or heard anything unusual take place' Where are you?
MARY BETH: (as she types) 'Neighbours in the building'.
CHRISTINE: Preliminary interviews. 'Neighbours in the building. No one saw or heard anything unusual. The Forensics report indicates a...' A what! What does that say? 'indicates a' what?
MARY BETH: (looking at the notebook) 'burglar'. B, U, R, G, L, A, R. You've gotta learn to read your own handwriting, Christine.
CHRISTINE: 'The Forensics report indicates a burglar (shouting and turning to Newman) who fits no pattern known to the Department at this time'!.
MARY BETH: Christine.
CHRISTINE: Mary Beth, please don't argue with me. It is not Newman's cat burglar. It is a different person. This I know.
MARY BETH: I was gonna ask who types up the DD5's when I go on leave?
CHRISTINE: I type.
COLEMAN: (handing her an envelope) Cagney.
MARY BETH: Yeah, I know. But who's gonna suss your handwriting?
CHRISTINE: We've got the ME's report! (taking out the report) OK. ...What is this? The major part of the autopsy was missed!
(she looks frantically in the envelope and then hands Mary Beth pages 1 and 3 and picks up the phone)
MARY BETH: Well, where's page two?
CHRISTINE: I'm gonna find out.
MARY BETH: No, forget it, Christine. They're Civil Service. They don't work outside normal hours, not like some people I could name.
CHRISTINE: Mary Beth, if we don't finish the paperwork now, we can't go back out on the streets tomorrow to find the perp. (putting down the phone) They're not in. We can't finish a DD5 without an autopsy report.
MARY BETH: (getting up) That's it, Christine. Good night.
(they sign out and make their way out)

[Precinct House front desk]

MARY BETH: Why didn't you tell me Charlie was sick?
CHRISTINE: Well he's not. It's just his cough.
MARY BETH: Did he see a doctor?
CHRISTINE: I was pushing, but you know how Charlie and how he feels about doctors. He promised me he'd take it easy so I said I'd bring him his dinner tonight.
MARY BETH: Oh, that's thoughtful, Christine.
CHRISTINE: (pausing at the candy machine) Hold on a sec. Oh, it's not really thoughtful. It's just Charlie. Actually it's a tradition. (taking a candy bar) Chinese Experience. When I was a kid. That was Charlie's version of chicken soup. He'd swear it would cure anything. Wanna bite?
MARY BETH: Are you kidding?
CHRISTINE: OK. Anyway, if ever I had a bad day at school or ..had a fight with my mother, Charlie would buy me a Chinese Experience. Said it would always put a smile on my face.
MARY BETH: Yeah. I'll have to remember that.

[Charlie's apartment]

(Charlie is watching TV. There is a knock at the door. Charlie opens it)
CHARLIE: Hey, it's the most beautiful cop in New York!
CHRISTINE: Hi, Pop.
CHARLIE: What took you so long?
CHRISTINE: I've brought the Chinese. (holding up a bag) Your very favourite.
CHARLIE: Oh, not on your life. We are going out to eat.
CHRISTINE: No! Charlie, (as he picks up a drink) you said you were gonna take it easy.
CHARLIE: I am alright! I am taking my Sergeant officer daughter out for a night on the town.
CHRISTINE: (as he starts to cough) No! You sound awful.
CHARLIE:How about one for the road?
CHRISTINE: (as he coughs again) Charlie, I don't think your drinking is a good idea. It pulls you down.
CHARLIE: (as she tries to take his glass away from him) Oh no. No, no, no, no. It's the best thing in the world for a cold. That what my sainted Irish grandmother used to say all the time.
CHRISTINE: (as she puts the bottle in a cupboard) I'll bet she did! We're staying home. We're gonna put our feet up. We've got an Experience. We're gonna watch TV. Do you know what's on? Isbecki told me. "Red River".
CHARLIE: Now you listen, Christine. Don't you baby me. Look, I'm the guy who used to change your diapers.
CHRISTINE: (putting her hands on his cheeks) Now look, you're all hot.
CHARLIE: (taking her hands down) I'm fine. Now, I am gonna go out and have a good time with a terrific woman who happens to love me. Now, what could be better for me than that?
CHRISTINE: You're staying in and having a good time with a terrific woman who loves you.
CHARLIE: (Charlie, chuckling) Here's your favourite purse. Let's go!
CHRISTINE: Charlie...
CHARLIE: Come on, come on.
CHRISTINE: It's a lousy idea.
CHARLIE: (pushing her towards the door) Now, you listen to your old man. I am telling you I feel like a million dollars.
CHRISTINE: (taking his glass from him and putting it down just inside the door) I don't think that'll be going with us, Charlie. I've been listening to you since I was four years old. That is it! Four!
(as Chris goes out of the door, Charlie picks up the glass and gulps down the drink)
CHRISTINE [OC]: What did I say?! Stop that now!

[Corridor in the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner]

(a body in a bag is wheeled past)
CHRISTINE: By about the fourth bar, now Charlie's really starting to give it to me. In front of everybody, he drops to his knees and pulls one of his 'Father, dear father, come home with me now!'. In front of everyone of course. They think it's hysterical and I feel like an idiot.
MARY BETH: Well, you were taking care of your dad, that's all.
CHRISTINE: (looking through a door window) Ah ha? I got Charlie into bed at two AM. That put me to bed at three.
MARY BETH: Oh, Chris...
(Nussbaum, in surgical gloves and theatre garb, comes out through the door)
CHRISTINE: Ah, doctor!
NUSSBAUM: Oh, hi. You needed to see me, Sergeant?
CHRISTINE: Oh, yeah, we've got a problem. The autopsy report you sent us yesterday.
NUSSBAUM: Ah, yes. Do you mind if we walk while we talk. If I don't get my sugar fix I'm gonna keel over.
CHRISTINE: Fine. Fine. Anyway, the autopsy report that you sent us yesterday...
NUSSBAUM: Now, which one was that?
MARY BETH: Mrs. Tatum O'Connell. She was an elderly woman who was strangled.
NUSSBAUM: Right! That's why you look familiar. I saw you at the scene.
CHRISTINE: Yesterday morning! Right! OK. Anyway the autopsy report you sent us yesterday had page two missing from it. We called your office who said they didn't know what happened to it. Apparently the one in your file has the same page missing.
MARY BETH: And the original's in transit, so they can't guarantee when we'll get it.
CHRISTINE: I wonder if you remember any salient points on the autopsy.
NUSSBAUM: (at the candy machine) Oh sugar! They're out of Jim Jams.
CHRISTINE: No! Doctor, the woman is seventy-eight years old. She couldn't have weighed more than a hundred pounds. It was just yesterday.
NUSSBAUM: Do you know how many people die in New York City in any twenty-four hour period? And how many I have to open up?! Ladies, I just cut 'em, and tell the tape about what I see. And then I do it again, ...and again. And I do my damnedest not to remember what I just saw. I don't know any other way to do the job. Have either of you got a dime? I'll have to have a bar that is ten cents more than a Jim Jam, and I don,t have the right change.
MARY BETH: Oh, sure.
NUSSBAUM: Oh, great!

[Precinct House front desk]

(the duo returns from the hospital)
CHRISTINE: Did you see that man? He ate that candy bar with his surgical gloves still on.
MARY BETH: I am trying to erase the scene from my memory.
(they look through messages that Coleman has given them)
CHRISTINE: Who's Anthiny Carpelli?!
COLEMAN: He certainly knew you. He said it was urgent. You haven't been in contact with anything lethal or that can transmit diseases, have you, Cagney.
CHRISTINE: Funny man, Coleman. Don't give up your day job.

[Detectives' Squad room]

MARY BETH: (as Newman bumps into her as he and Corassa leave) Hey, watch it here!
NEWMAN: We have a date with our cat burglar and your killer on Staten Island. Do you wanna be in on the bust?
CHRISTINE: Not particularly.
NEWMAN: (pushing by) Excuse me, sweetheart. Oh, excuse me. Sergeant sweetheart.
CHRISTINE: (shouting after Newman) If he smart mouths me one more time I'm gonna write him up!
ISBECKI: (who is standing there with Petrie) Don't you love it? The Hundred and Forty-sixth's just picked up this guy for speeding.
MARY BETH: No kidding. And it looked like Newman's cat burglar?
PETRIE: Yeah, they found some burglary tools and some diamond tie clasp that matches a hot sheet.
MARY BETH: Oh, that's good.
DETECTIVE: (holding a phone) Cagney, Anthony Carpelli.
PETRIE: Good. Terrific. And now, maybe, we'll have to hear about it for the next month.
CHRISTINE: (into phone) Yes, this is Sergeant Cagney.
ISBECKI: That guy definitely has an overgrown ego problem.
CHRISTINE: (into phone) Yes, how do you do, Mr. Carpelli? ...What?! ...When? ...Well, what happened?!! ...All right. Thank you. ...All right. Thank you.
MARY BETH: What?
CHRISTINE: That was Charlie's super. They've taken Charlie to the hospital. I've gotta go.
MARY BETH: I'll go with you.

[Hospital room]

(Chris comes in. A nurse is checking a drip that is attached to Charlie. Charlie makes a couple of coughs. Chris sits on the bed)
CHRISTINE: Pop?
CHARLIE: (in a strained voice) Oh, hey, hey, Chrissie.
CHRISTINE: Hi. ...What's the matter then?
CHARLIE: Oh. If you can believe this.
CHRISTINE: Is this the only way you can find a pretty nurse?
CHARLIE: Geeze. I hate places like this.
(he tries to cough again)
CHRISTINE: I know, it was a joke. You won't be in here very long.
CHARLIE: Hey, you been talking to the office?
CHRISTINE: No, not yet.
CHARLIE: I wanna get out of here.
(he coughs again)
CHRISTINE: I'll talk to the office, Pop.
CHARLIE: Don't make me wait.
(he coughs again)
CHRISTINE: I'm not trying to scare you. I'm taking care of you, Pop.
CHARLIE: You're doing a hell of a job.
(he coughs more persistently)
CHRISTINE: Come on, Charlie, I know you. You haven't been around this place in a couple of years. Giving them flak about the meals. Chasing after the nurses. (he coughs) They're gonna throw you out. (he tries to laugh) How much do you wanna bet?
CHARLIE: What?
CHRISTINE: Twenty bucks? That I pick you up next week.
CHARLIE: (weakly) Yes. OK. Twenty bucks.

[Hospital office]

DR. SHAPIRO: We got the pneumonia early. I've put him on antibiotics and breathing treatments around the clock. We should know something in forty-eight hours.
CHRISTINE: But he's gonna be OK?!
DR. SHAPIRO: This time, ...probably. Your father isn't a young man, Miss. Cagney. Pneumonia is hard on anyone, regardless of age. His condition makes it worse.
CHRISTINE: What condition?
DR. SHAPIRO: First of all there's an attritional deterioration. He hasn't been eating well. Probably because of the cough. He's anaemic. There's been some damage to his lungs from smoking.
CHRISTINE: Oh, wait a minute, Doctor. My father gave up smoking four years ago.
DR. SHAPIRO: You don't heal as well at his age. ...And you are aware he's an alcoholic?
CHRISTINE: I know he drinks.
DR. SHAPIRO: From what I've seen, I'd say Mr. Cagney's an alcoholic. Almost certainly in the first stages of cirrhosis. When he's up to it, I'd like to run some more tests on him.
CHRISTINE: Doctor, I don't... I don't understand what you're trying to tell me. How sick is my father?
DR. SHAPIRO: It's really hard to give you an exact answer.
CHRISTINE: What?
DR. SHAPIRO: Your father... Your father has a lifetime of bad habits catching up with him. In the long run he could be in for some serious health problems. ...Does he live alone? (Chris nods) Sooner or later that may have to change. Your father may eventually get to a point when he can't care for himself anymore.

[Hospital corridor]

CHRISTINE: He may be a doctor, Mary Beth, but he doesn't know a bean about Charlie. My father is not a statistic. He's as tough as they come.
MARY BETH: He'll be fine, Christine.
CHRISTINE: I know that. What do you think I've been telling you.
MARY BETH: What are you in such a hurry for?
CHRISTINE: I wanna get back to the Kelly apartment.
MARY BETH: What for?
CHRISTINE: There's something going on there that I don't like. I don't know what it is. I wanna see Mrs. O'Connell's room again.
MARY BETH: You don't have to do that now.
CHRISTINE: Well, what else is there to do? Everything else is...
MARY BETH: (pulling Chris back) Call the Lieutenant, and take the rest of the afternoon off.
CHRISTINE: I don't wanna take the rest of the afternoon off!
MARY BETH: You could phone in. You could sit with Charlie.
CHRISTINE: There's nothing I can do. He just needs rest, that's all.

[Outside the Kellys' apartment]

(Chris knocks. A young boy opens the door)
CHRISTINE: Hi. I'm Sergeant Cagney. This is Detective Lacey. We were here yesterday.
FRANK JR.: I remember.
CHRISTINE: Could we come in, please?
FRANK JR.: My parents aren't here.
MARY BETH: Oh, that's OK, Frank, we just wanna look around again.

[Kellys' apartment]

(he takes the door off the chain and lets them in. There is some rock music)
FRANK JR.: My parents had to go to discuss the... You know. The funeral.
CHRISTINE: We're sorry about your grandmother.
FRANK JR.: Yeah.
CHRISTINE: (leaving Mary Beth with Frank Jr.) Excuse me a minute.
(Chris takes down the police tape and goes into the bedroom)
MARY BETH: So? You OK?
FRANK JR.: Yeah. It's... I don't know.
MARY BETH: It's hard, huh? All the neighbours say your grandmother was a nice lady.
FRANK JR.: Yeah.
(he sits on the sofa. Mary Beth sits down beside him)
MARY BETH: So you sleep out here, huh?
FRANK JR.: Ever since Granny moved in.
MARY BETH: My husband and I were considering getting one of these foldaway sofas. Are they comfortable? I mean, it's er, kind of a thin mattress.
FRANK JR.: Yeah. You get used to it, I guess. It's just that my parents won't let me sleep with my music. They say it's too loud.
(Chris is looking around the bedroom and at the fire escape)
MARY BETH: Well, you can get those little earphones. You know, my son has those.

[Bedroom]

MARY BETH: (at the door) Did you figure it out yet?
CHRISTINE: Something... Something's not right here. I just don't know what it is.

[Manhattan street]

(Mary Beth rejoins Chris)
MARY BETH: Hey.
CHRISTINE: You must have had a more interesting floor than I did.
MARY BETH: You know the only thing that I got that we didn't get yesterday was a Mrs. Filerman, just one floor down from the Kellys. She said that they were always fighting.
CHRISTINE: We got that yesterday, from a neighbour upstairs.
MARY BETH: 'All the time' she says. And also that the husband left for a while. About the mother-in-law too. It could be something.
CHRISTINE: It's not difficult to expect them to be at each other's throats. How would you like to live like that? You're not a person, you're a nurse! That poor little kid gets thrown out of his room. He's sleeping on the living room couch! He has no privacy. There's nowhere to be alone in that place. ...If you're gonna walk out, stay out! What a way to live.
MARY BETH: Does your brother know about your dad yet?
CHRISTINE: (stopping and turning) Where in the hell did that come from?!
MARY BETH: Well, your father is sick. I think his son would like to know.
CHRISTINE: I'm working on a murder case here! And you're worried about my brother in California! I'll tell ya, Mary Beth, you're the best. The best.
(she gets in the car)

[Precinct yard]

(the duo has just got out of the car)
CHRISTINE: He's not that sick.
MARY BETH: He's in a hospital, Christine.
CHRISTINE: Yeah. I've got a twenty dollar bet that he's gonna be out by the end of next week.
MARY BETH: A plane from California takes five hours. You dial. There are eleven digits.
CHRISTINE: I'm gonna ask Charlie if he wants me to call him.
MARY BETH: When?
CHRISTINE: When I see him.

[Detectives' Squad room]

ISBECKI: (as the duo comes back in) Hey, Cagney, did you hear the news? They got a full confession from that cat burglar that I picked up last night.
PETRIE: A half an hour before your homicide came down. Congratulations, Chris, you were right about it being a separate case.
CHRISTINE: All right!!! Thanks, guys!! ...The same guy? huh?! (looking for Newman) I'm gonna make that arroagnat punk eat humble pie.
MARY BETH: Oh, come on, Christine. He's doing his job.
CHRISTINE: (walking purposefully towards Newman) I can't help it. It too good to pass up. So, Newman!!!
NEWMAN: Sergeant Cagney. I've been looking for you.
CHRISTINE: Oh, I bet you have. Waiting to admit I was right about the cat burglar, huh?
NEWMAN: It couldn't have happened to a better cop. ...Cagney, I salute you.
MARY BETH: (shouting) Christine!
CHRISTINE: What?!
NEWMAN: You had it pegged right from the start. Every time I think I'm getting this down, it takes one of you ...old-timers with all of your years on the beat to come along and show me the ropes. Thank you, Sergeant. (Chris reluctantly extends a hand which Newman shakes) I really mean that.
CHRISTINE: (shouting after him) Newman, come back! You're not gonna get away with that!
MARY BETH: Christine!
CHRISTINE: He took all the fun out of it!
MARY BETH: We've got page two. Do you wanna look at it?

[Samuels' office]

(he is looking at page 2)
CHRISTINE: She was smothered. Probably with a pillow while she was sleeping.
SAMUELS: You think it was the burglar that smothered her, huh?
CHRISTINE: No, I really don't think so, Lieutenant. There's an electrical cord tied round her neck indicating that she'd been strangled. Now what kind of a burglar would go in, smother some poor old woman and then tie a cord around her neck pretending he'd strangled her.
MARY BETH: Apart from that, sir, Mrs. O'Connell was bedridden. Completely. She couldn't have gotten out of bed.
CHRISTINE: The family never mentioned to us that she was bedridden.
MARY BETH: If it hadn't been in the ME's report we wouldn't have known.
CHRISTINE: Also we have reports from a neighbour saying that the husband and wife fought all the time over her mother.
MARY BETH: Mr. Kelly walked out on the marriage for a time.
CHRISTINE: Yeah. There wasn't much money around. As a matter of fact Mrs. Kelly quit her secretarial job to nurse the mother, which gave them even less money. So they hardly ever went out. I mean, it was like living in a hospital ward.
SAMUELS: I see where you're going. So you don't think there was any burglar at all.
CHRISTINE: Do you want the clincher? The television. They left her watching the television.
SAMUELS: And now you've lost me.
CHRISTINE: Frank Kelly said when he came back at the end of the evening, he went in to check on her. He said he couldn't see any electrical cord around her neck because there was no light. But if the television was on, there was light.
MARY BETH: And if it was off, who turned it off? Not a burglar. He would have wanted the noise. And the old woman didn't do it. She was bedridden.
SAMUELS: Remote control?
CHRISTINE: No. They had a twelve year-old portable set. No remote control. So either the set was on or Frank Kelly is lying about the electrical cord.
MARY BETH: It doesn't make sense either, since she was smothered.
CHRISTINE: There was somebody else went in, not a burglar, and turned the set off. the only likely people...
SAMUELS: The Kellys! Mm? Domestic violence.
MARY BETH: Yes sir. It's someone in the family.

[Outside the Kellys' apartment]

(as Mary Beth knocks on the door Chris draws her attention to the Kelly family returning)
CHRISTINE: Mr. and Mrs. Kelly.
MEGEN KELLY: We were at the funeral home.
CHRISTINE: (to the son) Hi Frank.
MARY BETH: Oh, we've picked a bad time. I'm sorry.
CHRISTINE: Can we come in?
FRANK KELLY: Do you have to?
MARY BETH: Well, sir, we could come back tomorrow but if we could tie up these loose ends here today, then maybe we wouldn't have to bother you any more. Most of them are paperwork.
MEGEN KELLY: I understand.
FRANK KELLY: (as he goes to open the door) Excuse me.

[Kellys' apartment]

FRANK KELLY: Frank, take the coats in the bedroom. OK?
MEGEN KELLY: Would you like some coffee?
CHRISTINE: No. No thank you.
(Chris sits herself down while the others continue to stand)
MARY BETH: No, don't put yourself to any trouble. You're the one they should be taking care of now. You've been through a lot.
FRANK KELLY: Yes, it's been pretty tough around here.
MARY BETH: Tough? Taking care of your mother, then losing her like that. That's gotta be a shock.
MEGEN KELLY: It takes some time.
MARY BETH: Still, ma'am, and I hope you don't take this wrong, but in some ways it has to be a relief too.
FRANK KELLY: What are you saying?
MARY BETH: Well, she was a very sick woman, you know. Very frail. Confined to her bed.
MEGEN KELLY: After the stroke.
MARY BETH: Yeah, I can imagine what that's like. (sitting down) I mean, the doctors are big heroes. Right? With their tubes and medicines. Machines. I mean, I wonder sometimes, if they're really doing anybody a favour. Sometimes, maybe, you think it would be kinder just to let them go.
FRANK KELLY: That's true. It wasn't any great blessing to keep her alive.
MARY BETH: Ah ha.
(the Kellys sit down)
CHRISTINE: It must have been quite a strain for you. I understand you and Mrs. Kelly separated for a while.
(Mrs. Kelly seems uneasy. Mr. Kelly puts is hand on her arm)
FRANK KELLY: That's right.
CHRISTINE: Was it anything to do with the mother-in-law living here?
MEGEN KELLY: It was no problem. Frank and my mother got along fine.
CHRISTINE: So why did you leave?
FRANK KELLY: You've got no right to butt into our personal business like this.
MARY BETH: Oh, we're sorry, Mr. Kelly, but sometimes questions like these are necessary.
FRANK KELLY: We separated for personal reasons, but it had nothing to do with Megen's mother!
MARY BETH: But you said it was tough?
FRANK KELLY: Yeah. Mr. Kelly, there is one thing that I don't understand, sir. Your mother-in-law was confined to her bed.
MEGEN KELLY: That's right.
MARY BETH: And the burglar stole money from her pocketbook?
CHRISTINE: If she never left the apartment, what was she doing with three hundred dollars in her pocketbook? And why did she wear a gold necklace in bed?
(there is a sound of music starting up in the bedroom)
MEGEN KELLY: My mother found it difficult to deal with her helplessness. She always was such a strong woman who was caring for everyone. It was our way of humouring her.
CHRISTINE: (getting up) Mr. Kelly, you told me that when you looked in on your mother-in-law, the television set was turned off. Mrs. Kelly told my partner here that the television set was left on so Mrs. O'Connell would have something to look at when you were all gone. Who turned the television back off again?
FRANK KELLY: (getting up and yelling out) Frankie, I told you not to play that music! Why are you asking us all this?
MEGEN KELLY: (getting up as well) Maybe I was mistaken.
CHRISTINE: Well why was an electrical cord tied around your mother's neck when she'd already been smothered?
FRANK KELLY: We're not answering any more of your questions until we have a lawyer.

[Todd Feldberg's office]

(the duo are in the DA's office)
CHRISTINE: I'm telling you, the man murdered his wife's mother and she's not willing to admit it. Either she's trying to protect him for some reason or she's afraid. I don't know.
FELDBERG: Yes, but that's a hunch, Cagney. You're asking me to go out on a limb.
CHRISTINE: Hey, you've always won, Feldberg. As a matter of fact you owe me a couple of 'em. All I'm asking is your permission to bring them in as a material witnesses.
FELDBERG: All! That's all?!
CHRISTINE: If I can get hold of the wife I think I can break her. She just needs pushing. She needs reminding that this man has murdered her mother.
FELDBERG: Oh, I see. That's just terrific. So, I'm supposed to go up in front of a judge...
CHRISTINE: Or at least convince her she doesn't have to be afraid.
FELDBERG: So, I'm supposed to say that we wanna bring someone in so we can browbeat her into implicating her husband!
CHRISTINE: Well I don't know what else to do. Do you?
FELDBERG: What if she did it?
CHRISTINE: No! Everything points to him.
FELDBERG: Look. Look, this is all circumstantial. It won't fly. Now, if you wouldn't mind clearing out of my office, I have a date with a very tall, beautiful, blonde lady whom I am meeting in forty-five minutes for drinks at The Plaza, and if I am lucky we may never leave the hotel.
CHRISTINE: Feldman, that is wonderful, really, and I do know that a successful seduction is probably an historic occasion in your life.
MARY BETH: Mr. Feldberg, this is not a fishing expedition. My partner has a pretty good idea here.
FELDBERG: Oh, well, well, good for her. An historic occasion in her life.
CHRISTINE: Look, Feldberg, I'll can the smart-mouthing if you will. Right? I really think I can pull this off. Otherwise Frank Kelly walks.
FELDBERG: (who by now has got his coat on) The funeral's tomorrow?
MARY BETH: Yes sir. In the morning.
FELDBERG: Do you know, if they challenge this in court we don't have a chance in the world.
CHRISTINE: Hey, you got a better idea, I'm open.
FELDBERG: OK. OK, maybe I can get this by Judge McIroy. Let em bury the old lady. Pick 'em up afterwards.
CHRISTINE: (as Feldberg goes to leave) Great. When can we pick up the papers?
FELDBERG: It depends on the blonde.
MARY BETH: (going out) Be an ace.
FELDBERG: Could get lucky.
CHRISTINE: (going out) See you soon.

[Detectives' Squad room]

SAMUELS: This kind of performance reflects well on the whole Squad. Tying those burglaries into the guy that the One Forty-six got out to Staten Island. That was a good piece of solid investigative work. (shaking Newman's hand while nodding to Petrie and Isbecki) Even though they're getting the collars, this is something I'm unlikely to forget.
NEWMAN: Thank you, boss, it wasn't really all that special.
SAMUELS: (shaking Corassa's hand) Come on, now, no need to be modest.
(Samuels goes to his office. The duo is sitting listening while the others continue to talk about it)
CHRISTINE: That mad-arse.
MARY BETH: Huh?
CHRISTINE: (quietly) I think I'm going to be sick.
MARY BETH: Oh, let it go, Christine. He did good work, he deserves some credit.
CHRISTINE: (as Mary Beth goes to sign out) What are you doing?
MARY BETH: I'm going home.
CHRISTINE: I've got some other angles that we haven't looked on, Mary Beth.
MARY BETH: I was due to go off shift seventeen minutes ago.
CHRISTINE: Yeah!
MARY BETH: I know this is hard for you to believe, but it's been a very long day and I do have another life. It's called a family. I've got one husband, two children and another one on the way. And as I remember, you also have a family. He happens to be in a hospital. Leave it alone for a night. OK? It'll all still be here in the morning, Christine, and I don't wanna discuss it. Good night. ...Say 'Hi' to Charlie for me.
(Chris decides to sign out and leave. Newman comes up to her)
NEWMAN: Cagney. I have heard you were having some problems.
CHRISTINE: I beg your pardon.
NEWMAN: With your case. I was just wondering if you need any help, ...'cos I'm free now.
CHRISTINE: Oh, thank you, Newman.
NEWMAN: Unofficially, of course, 'cos, you know, when I break this case, I'll still let you have this collar. ...Sergeant.
CHRISTINE: Oh, thank you, Detective. I'll tell you what. Why don't you let me check back with you when hell freezes over. Excuse me, please.

[Laceys' bedroom]

(Mary Beth is flat out asleep in her day clothes on top of the bed. Harvey comes in quietly with a tray with a meal on it and touches her hand. She awakes, startled)
HARVEY: I'm sorry.
MARY BETH: What time is it?
HARVEY: Six. Tea's ready.
MARY BETH: Oh. Ha.
HARVEY: Do you wanna go back to sleep?
MARY BETH: No. I was only resting my eyes. (Harvey chuckles. Looking at the tray) That looks good.
HARVEY: I thought you weren't gonna be working these long hours anymore. What happened to clerical duty?
MARY BETH: Oh boy. I hate clerical duty. (sleepily as Harvey helps her off with her topcoat) Paperwork up to my eyebrows. Typing my fingers down to the bone. I became a cop in the first place so I wouldn't have to type.
HARVEY: Yeah. Because it paid fifty dollars more than a secretary's job.
MARY BETH: That's true.
HARVEY: Mm hm. Now with clerical work, you'd get off your feet. Be home at five. Get yourself some decent sleep.
MARY BETH: Soon. OK?
HARVEY: Ah ha.
MARY BETH: I... I don't feel right about doing that to Chris now.
HARVEY: Chris! She can take care of herself. I want you to eat your green beans.
MARY BETH: (as she starts to eat) No, she can't right now, Harve. Not with her dad in the hospital. This case we're on is making her crazy.
HARVEY: I thought it could only make you crazy.
MARY BETH: Her too. She just hides it better. ...I mean, a case like this. A helpless old lady getting murdered. Makes you start to think weird stuff.
HARVEY: Charlie's gonna be OK?
MARY BETH: Yeah. Sure....For now. But he's sick ...now. Not getting any younger. ...Some part of Christine is still her daddy's little girl. ...She wants to believe he's gonna be healthy forever. And live forever. ...It scares her to see him like this.
HARVEY: Did she say that?
MARY BETH: You know Christine. What do you think?
HARVEY: I was thinking of getting you some salad. You don't eat enough greens.
(Harvey leaves)
MARY BETH: (to herself) I hate green food.

[Hospital room]

(Charlie is snoozing. Chris picks up a magazine, MYSTIQUE, which Charlie had been reading. It has a naked blonde on the front cover)
CHRISTINE: I take it you're feeling better.
CHARLIE: What?!
CHRISTINE: (showing him the magazine front cover) Feeling better?
CHARLIE: (half coughing, half laughing) It came with Newman. He came by to see me this afternoon. (Chris looks non-plussed) Thought it might cheer me up.
CHRISTINE: Detective Newman?
CHARLIE: Yeah. Yeah. Tommy Lafferty brought him down to Flannery's a while back. We... We played a couple of rounds of poker. You know, that Newman's a sharp kid.
CHRISTINE: (sitting on the bed) Full of himself.
CHARLIE: Yeah. ...Yeah. (she takes off his glasses) Oh. Thanks. Hey, I hear you've got a tough homicide on your hands.
CHRISTINE: No, Pop. I don't wanna talk about my work.
CHARLIE: Oh, since when? Old lady, yeah? Probably somebody in the family offed her?. ...You got a motive yet?
CHRISTINE: No. We don't know yet.
CHARLIE: Oh, come on, Chrissie, don't do that to me! Newman told me all about it. Said she's bedridden. Family's going to hell, so one of them killed her! What's the matter? Didn't you think that I'd be able to ...take hearing about that?!
CHRISTINE: Oh, no Pop, I just know you have so much on your mind. I didn't wanna bother with...
CHARLIE: Oh, geeze, that's the biggest bit of garbage I've ever heard! People think you're old, the first thing that happens, they start treating ya different. Even the ones that oughta know better do it! I am not gonna go like that! Do you hear me?!! ...Chrissie. Chrissie, I want you to promise me something.
CHRISTINE: Charlie!
CHARLIE: I don't wanna ruin your life and have you end up hating me.
CHRISTINE: I don't hate you, Poppa.
CHARLIE: Chrissie, before it goes too far. Before it comes to that, hand me my gun, and let me end it myself.
CHRISTINE: Charlie, I don't want you talking this way.
CHARLIE: A little dignity. Do you understand?!!
CHRISTINE: Daddy, the doctor's saying you're gonna be all right.
CHARLIE: Yeah. (coughing) For now. And then... Then... Then what happens?
(Charlie has a coughing spasm)
CHRISTINE: I love you dearly, Poppa.
CHARLIE: Oh, Chrissie.
(he nods off)

[Graveyard]

(Mrs. O'Connell's committal to the grave is in progress)
PRIEST: We are confident that all those that have died in Christ will be raised to life on the last day and live with Christ forever. We thank you for all the blessings you gave her in this life, to show your fatherly care for all of us, and the fellowship which is ours with the saints, through Jesus Christ. Lord hear our prayer. Welcome our sister to Paradise, and help us to comfort each other with the assurance of our faith until we all meet in Christ, to be with you and with our sister forever. We ask this through Christ, our Lord. Amen.
(Mary Beth is sitting some way off in the car)
PRIEST: In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.
(a cab arrives. Chris gets out and gets in the car)

[Squad car]

(Mary Beth is pressing her left nostril with her eyes closed)
CHRISTINE: I've got the papers. We're taking them in.
MARY BETH: (nasally) Good.
CHRISTINE: What are you doing?
MARY BETH: (nasally) Meditation's good for the baby. ...How's Charlie?
CHRISTINE: Fine. ...Newman came by and saw him. Brought him one of those dirty magazines. Do you love that? So what's been going on?
MARY BETH: (nasally) Nothing.
CHRISTINE: Really?! How can you tell?
MARY BETH: I don't have to watch anymore to tell what those people are doing over there. They're burying somebody they love.
CHRISTINE: They're burying somebody they killed.
MARY BETH: They're grieving like you and I would.
CHRISTINE: Yeah, I was just thinking that.
MARY BETH: (looking across at Mrs. Kelly comforting Frank Jr.) Really?
CHRISTINE: One of them killed that old lady.
MARY BETH: Maybe. I don't know.
CHRISTINE: No? I do. I can't believe you're this detached.
MARY BETH: Maybe I am. Or maybe you're too involved. I understand why you are, Christine. I do. But I gotta pull back. Yesterday I thought that I could stick it out, but today I don't know. Look at us. Staking out a funeral.

[Interview room]

MORT JEFFRIES: My clients have refused to answer your questions.
CHRISTINE: Because it would incriminate them?
MORT JEFFRIES: No. Because the Constitution says they can. They don't need any more reason than that. So I believe the next step is for you to be release them.
CHRISTINE: With this material witness warrant we can hold the Kellys for as long as we want to.
MORT JEFFRIES: For as long as the judge allows, which will be about ten seconds. You are hounding these unfortunate people who have lost a loved mother on the basis of nothing more than circumstantial evidence, because you are either too lazy or too incompetent to find the real...
MARY BETH: I suggest you are out of line, sir!
MORT JEFFRIES: I think this might be of interest to a number of reporters I know.
CHRISTINE: Will you hold on just one minute?! We think Mr. Kelly murdered his mother-in-law and intimidated his wife into silence.
MEGEN KELLY: No.
MORT JEFFRIES: Sergeant Cagney, this is unconstitutional.
CHRISTINE: I am merely trying to let the woman know that we are offering her protection.
MORT JEFFRIES: You cannot talk to my clients!!
CHRISTINE: I'm talking to you!!! He killed her mother!! I'm trying to find out why she's protecting him.
MEGEN KELLY: He didn't!
MORT JEFFRIES: Mrs. Kelly.
MEGEN KELLY: He didn't do it! There were fights. It was awful with her there.
MORT JEFFRIES: Mrs. Kelly.
MEGEN KELLY: Will you listen now!! It wasn't him!!!
CHRISTINE: Well if it wasn't him, Mrs. Kelly, who did it?
MORT JEFFRIES: Mrs. Kelly, please listen to me. These people are not your friends.
MEGEN KELLY: My husband is a good, good man. Better than you'll ever know. Can't you just leave him alone?
MORT JEFFRIES: (standing up) I'm gonna get a bond for a writ of habeas corpus. If my clients are not released today, I shall institute a wrongful arrest suit against you and the City of New York.
(Mrs. Kelly is crying on her husband's shoulder whilst he comforts her)

[Detectives' Squad room]

(the duo comes down the stairs from the interview room. Mary Beth is holding her stomach)
MARY BETH: Did you see how those two people were each other. That man did not kill his wife's mother.
CHRISTINE: Do you know what it means if it wasn't Mr. Kelly?
(Mary Beth heads for her desk)
CHRISTINE: Mary Beth, I'm talking to you.
MARY BETH: I've ought to take my vitamins. I forgot it the last two days.
CHRISTINE: It must be a member of the family otherwise they wouldn't be covering up. There's only one other person in the house who heard the Kellys and that old woman.
(Mary Beth heads off with her pills)
CHRISTINE: Mary Beth?
(at the drinking fountain)
MARY BETH: When are they gonna fix this thing. right! (heading off and shouting) How's a person supposed to take pills without water, huh?!
CHRISTINE: (following Mary Beth) Will you slow down?! I know you don't want to look at this. I think it's pretty obvious, but it's not gonna make it go away!

[Ladies room]

CHRISTINE: Are you listening to me or not?
MARY BETH: He's twelve years old!
CHRISTINE: Do you know how miserable that kid was after the grand mother moved in with him? He was thrown out of his room, his parents fought like cats and dogs, and the father walked out on them for a while. And you heard Frank Kelly yesterday. How many times do you think that kid said that he'd better off if his grandmother were dead?
MARY BETH: I don't wanna know.
CHRISTINE: No?! We've gotta think of alternatives, Mary Beth. He was left there alone. He went into his grandmother's bedroom with a pillow.
MARY BETH: He's twelve years old. A twelve year-old murders his grandmother for what? To get his room back? It's sick!! It makes me sick!!!
CHRISTINE: Maybe that isn't the reason! Maybe he did it to put her out of her misery. Maybe he did it ...because he thought everybody would be better off if ...she died in her sleep. I don't know. But I do know, and I know that you know too, he's the only one that could have done it. (Mary Beth is standing looking aghast through all of this) I'm calling Feldberg.
MARY BETH: Chris! Wait, wait. I... I told Harvey last night I was gonna hang in for ya but I can't. I'm going on clerical.
CHRISTINE: Let's talk about that later. Right?!
(Chris starts to leave)
MARY BETH: I don't wanna talk about it. I made up my mind. I thought I could separate myself from the work ...and I can't do it. Not while I'm on the streets. (Chris turns back) It's getting to me, Christine. It's getting to my baby too. ...I care about you and I care about the work. ...But I've gotta keep a balance. You know what I mean? (Chris almost breaks down) Do you understand me? ..Chris?
CHRISTINE: Yeah, I understand.
MARY BETH: OK. ...Do you wanna call Feldberg?
CHRISTINE: In a minute. ...It's going away. I'm gonna sit down.
(Mary Beth sits down beside her on the bench)

[Hospital room]

(Charlie is asleep. Chris is looking at him)
CHRISTINE: (quietly) Pop. ...I want you to understand, Charlie. ...I promise...
(as she leaves, Charlie gives a couple of involuntary coughs)

[Hospital corridor]

(Chris picks up a payphone receiver and dials)
CHRISTINE: (into phone) Yes, operator, I'd like to place a person-to-person call to Mr. Brian Cagney in Los Angeles.

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