Stress
Original Airdate: February 4, 1985

[Detectives' Squad room]

CHRISTINE: (coming in reading from a newspaper advert) 'Integrated amplifier with five band equaliser, one hundred watts per channel'. Doesn't that sound fantastic?
MARY BETH: Sounds expensive.
CHRISTINE: Right. It's on sale, eight hundred and fifty bucks, on 14th Street.
MARY BETH: Since you're asking me, eight hundred and fifty bucks for a stereo is expensive.
CHRISTINE: It's state-of-the-art, Mary Beth. Sign me in, will ya?
MARY BETH: Yes.
CHRISTINE: Look at this. There must be six hundred people downtown who do nothing but write memos. If it wasn't about the Police Department they'd stay in touch. 'Retirement Plan', 'Credit Union', 'Uniform Inspection'. Listen to this. 'Stress Reduction Encounter Group'. Don't you love that?
MARY BETH: (taking the memo) That's this week.
CHRISTINE: What's the Stress Reduction Encounter Group?
MARY BETH: Well it says right here. 'Helps you deal with job-related stressful police work'.
CHRISTINE: (taking back the memo) Well, thank you too much. I'd rather go skiing.
LA GUARDIA: Do you have the paperwork on the Mendoza collar?
CHRISTINE: (looking at the memo) They can't do this!
LA GUARDIA: Do what?
CHRISTINE: It's mandatory!
LA GUARDIA: (taking the memo) Oh, I saw that. Apparently it's a pilot programme they're developing citywide for all departments.
CHRISTINE: Well, I don't need somebody telling me how to solve my problems. Do you?
LA GUARDIA: Well, there have been studies done to indicate that sharing your feelings about your work with colleagues is a very effective way of dealing with job-related stress.
CHRISTINE: When I'm stressed out, I jog. Three miles on spaghetti.
SAMUELS [OC]: Cagney! Lacey!
MARY BETH: Talking about your feelings can't hurt you, Christine.

[Samuels' office]

SAMUELS: Morning.
CHRISTINE/MARY BETH: Morning, sir.
CHRISTINE: Lieutenant, did you read about this Stress Reduction Encounter Group?
SAMUELS: Yeah, what about it?
CHRISTINE: Well, ...we don't have to attend that, do we?
SAMUELS: Yeah, it's mandatory. And it's a very good idea too, I think.
CHRISTINE: You do?
SAMUELS: Oh, absolutely, Cagney. Sure. They started it a couple of years ago on a voluntary basis, and I attended a few and I found them to be very helpful. Yeah. Here. (handing them each a document) This is from downtown. It seems we've got a problem here. Apparently you two have piled up an inordinate amount of overtime.
CHRISTINE: Oh yeah. Are they impressed?
SAMUELS: They're worried! It's fouling up the accounting system.
MARY BETH: Well, what exactly are we supposed to do about this, sir?
SAMUELS: Well, you take off the rest of the day off today and a couple of three day weekends and everybody's gonna be happy.
CHRISTINE: Lieutenant, we have a very heavy caseload.
SAMUELS: Well, I don't like this any more than you do, but you're screwing up the computers, so get out of here, will ya, the both of yous.
MARY BETH: You mean, go home, sir?
SAMUELS: I don't care where you go. Just as long as you sign out and disappear!
MARY BETH: Yes sir.
CHRISTINE: Well, couldn't we work and not put in for it? (Mary Beth is trying to leave) This is ridiculous. We're already here!
SAMUELS: Cagney, what is wrong with a day off?! Go to the park. Go to the movies. Go to New Jersey! I don't care where you go. Just as long as you're not here today, because the New York City Police Department cannot afford to have you here! OK?
MARY BETH: (dragging Chris out) Yes sir, Thank you, sir.

[Detectives' Squad room]

CHRISTINE: I don't understand this department sometimes.
MARY BETH: I can think of worse things than a day off, Christine. (going over to the board to sign out) I'll get it.
CHRISTINE: (putting on her coat) Compulsory days off. Compulsory group therapy. So what are you gonna do?
MARY BETH: Oh, I don't know. Maybe I'll clean out the closet. I've been promising to do that for months.
CHRISTINE: Why don't you come with me? We'll go to the stereo sale!
MARY BETH: No thank you.
CHRISTINE: Mary Beth, these sound systems can be ...very ...sexy. Maybe spice up your marriage!
MARY BETH: My marriage doesn't need spicing up. Thank you.
CHRISTINE: Think of it, Mary Beth. Harvey ...comes home. Johnny Metz is on the stereo, oozing out. One ...hundred ...watts ...per channel. (demonstrating) You ...slip into something ...casual! Johnny's voice melts down the last of Harvey's inhibitions.
MARY BETH: You've been reading trashy books again, Christine.
CHRISTINE: (as Mary Beth leaves, she looks at the advert) It always worked for me.

[Stereo store]

SALESMAN: No, no, no. We're sold out of that one, but take a look over here. Here, let me show you something. The frequency response on this little number is so awesome, it'll curl your toes.
CHRISTINE: Is that so?
SALESMAN: Yeah, and I can give you a good price.
CHRISTINE: Like eight hundred and fifty?
SALESMAN: Hey, say, you look like an intelligent woman, let me level with ya. You wouldn't want a stereo at that end. (quietly) It's a piece of junk. ...I'm telling ya.
CHRISTINE: (indicating the 'little number') How much is this one?
SALESMAN: Well, I don't have the exact numbers on it...
CHRISTINE: Hey, you look like an intelligent man, take a guess.
SALESMAN: Now, let's see, you are gonna want the ten-band equaliser, a cassette deck, at least a hundred watts per channel, What's that? I'm saying you're looking at twenty-four, twenty-five hundred dollars. House. Out the door.
CHRISTINE: You asking people in here with an eight hundred and fifty ad and sell 'em something for twenty-five hundred bucks?
SALESMAN: The thing is... I told ya. We're sold out of the one you want. Come on, let me show you this baby. (Chris hands him the newspaper and walks away) Hey, hey, sweetheart, where are ya going? It's a good...

[Manhattan street]

(a man in a raincoat, Martin Gelband, is arguing and wrestling with an unshaven man in a bomber jacket, Darryl Stokes. Chris comes out of the store. Stokes knifes the other man and flees)
CHRISTINE: (with gun drawn) Police! Hold it right there!
GELBAND: (sinking to the pavement) Oh, my God!
CHRISTINE: Somebody, get an ambulance!! Hold it!!!
(she gives chase shouting 'Police' etc. through the crowds. Stokes runs into a deliveryman and his barrow of goods. He tumbles to the ground)
CHRISTINE: (gun drawn) I said 'Hold it right there'. Apparently you didn't here me. Now drop that knife! ...I said 'Drop it'. ...Slide it over to me slowly. ...Farther. ...Slowly.

[Precinct House front desk]

COLEMAN: I hope these sessions don't get touchy-feely.
ISBECKI: I hear they do it in the nude in California.
COLEMAN: Fortunately this is New York.
ISBECKI: I do one hundred push-ups every morning.
COLEMAN: You're a wonderful person.
(a dog barks)
ISBECKI: Hey, little guy. Are you lost?
(the dog wines)
SAMUELS: (walking in) What's a dog doing here? Who does he belong to?
ISBECKI: I don't know. He doesn't have a collar.
SAMUELS: Have 'em come and pick him up.
ISBECKI: Hey, Lieutenant, you know what they do with them at the pound. Let me try to find him a home. I'd take him, but my building doesn't allow pets.
(the dog is sitting looking at Samuels. He wines again)
SAMUELS: Just make sure he's gone by the end of the day.
ISBECKI: Yes sir! Thank you, sir.
(the dog barks and runs off after Samuels and sits outside his office. Isbecki laughs. Chris brings Stokes in. He is whistling)
CHRISTINE: (to a uniformed officer) Thank you, I can take it from here.
ISBECKI: Do you need a hand, Cagney.
CHRISTINE: No thank you, Victor.

[Detectives' Squad room]

CHRISTINE: (to Stokes) All right. Have a seat. (he whistles and turns and looks at her) I said 'Sit down'! (he sits down) Do your family know what you do for a living? (he smiles and whistles. She puts a sheet of paper in her typewriter) Name? (he continues to whistle) I asked you your name.
STOKES: (he whistles two notes) I thought you said I had the right to remain silent.
CHRISTINE: I'm not asking for a biography, I just want your name and address.
STOKES: (leaning forward) How would you like to spend the rest of your life missing some major parts of your anatomy?
CHRISTINE: (after a pause) What did you say? (he whistles twice again. Chris types) Are you threatening me?
STOKES: Oh, why I wouldn't do that to a police officer. That's illegal, isn't it? (she types some more) Look, do you wanna give me your name now or after arraignment in court tomorrow. Either, I don't give a damn, so what's it gonna be. (he whistles again. Chris shouts out) Charlie!
STOKES: Stokes.
CHRISTINE: Spell it.
STOKES: S, T, O, K, E...
CHRISTINE: S.
(he whistles twice)

[Feldberg's office]

FELDBERG: (looking through a card index) Stokes, Stokes, Stokes, Here it is Darryl Stokes. (looking at a file) He was arraigned yesterday afternoon, bailed, five thousand dollars.
CHRISTINE: That all?! For a sleaze like that? Come on!
FELDBERG: Well, you know how this game is played, Detective. I ask the court to set bail at half a million, but the defence ask them to send him home on his own recognisance because he's such a nice guy, and the judge comes up with something in between.
CHRISTINE: Well, I wouldn't call five thousand dollars 'something in between'.
FELDBERG: So maybe the judge was in a hurry to play golf!
CHRISTINE: And maybe you're not good at playing the game!
FELDBERG: Say look, don't come in here...
CHRISTINE: Feldberg, I need you to go back into court and ask for a higher bail.
FELDBERG: Five thousand dollars is pretty standard for a case like this.
CHRISTINE: (grabbing the file) Did you look at his yellow sheet?! Come on, armed robbery, attempted rape.
FELDBERG: Yeah, no convictions, cases dropped before trial.
CHRISTINE: Yeah, right, and I talked to the investigating officers on those cases. They think Stokes has been intimidating witnesses into refusing to testify. Hell, he threatened me in the precinct.
FELDBERG: All right, all right. How am I supposed to know that? (he dials a number) You know, it makes me wonder though, if you're so concerned about this case, how come you weren't at the arraignment? (into phone) Judge Kaminsky's chambers, I need to talk to his clerk. (to Chris) So, where were you?
CHRISTINE: My Lieutenant sent me home. I've been pulling too much overtime.
FELDBERG: Ha. You're kidding? (into phone) Hello, Elliot. Todd Feldberg from the DA's Office. ...Hanging in there. Listen. I need a decision for an increase in bail on a Darryl Stokes. ...Yeah, I'll hold. (to Chris) So, what are you doing? Bucking for sergeant? Or are you just glutton for work? (into phone) What was that? ...Well, he's a lucky man. ...Yeah. ...See you around, Elliot.
(he rings off)
FELDBERG: Well, Cagney, this conversation can now be classified as academic.
CHRISTINE: I beg your pardon?
FELDBERG: Stokes posted an hour ago. He's out of our hands until his court date.

[Squad car]

CHRISTINE: Did you read these witness statements? The newsvendor said he didn't see anything. The street worker says he saw nothing. Oh, this is great.
MARY BETH: What's that?
CHRISTINE: Last Saturday I was reading my horoscope. It had no witnesses. I'm telling you, Mary Beth, the victim is being charged admission until he can pay his hospital bills!
MARY BETH: We have seven witnesses we haven't even talked to. No to mention the fact that you can ID Stokes. We've got a victim that can testify. What's the big deal? We've got a dead-bang case here.
CHRISTINE: I just hope it's not a case where the victim doesn't wanna press charges.
MARY BETH: Not everybody in the City of New York doesn't wanna get involved, Christine.
CHRISTINE: No? Just eight hard witnesses to a stabbing in broad daylight.
MARY BETH: Cynical. Cynical. You go funny over the damnedest cases.

[Hospital room]

GELBAND: (to Chris) They tell me that you saved my life. That's good.
CHRISTINE: How are you feeling?
GELBAND: Well, I'm OK, I guess. The doctor says that next week I should be enjoying a swing in the tree of life.
CHRISTINE: He didn't happen to say where you could find it, did he?
GELBAND: Well, well I...
MARY BETH: Mr. Gelband, do you mind telling us what happened?
GELBAND: Well, there's not much to tell. This character just pulled a knife and told me to give him my wallet.
MARY BETH: Did you?
GELBAND: Yeah, I don't want any trouble.
MARY BETH: And then what?
GELBAND: Well, I only had five bucks and this guy started ranting and raving and the next thing that I know ...I'm stabbed.
CHRISTINE: Mr. Gelband, we need you to testify.
GELBAND: All right. Whatever I can do to get this guy off the streets. Right!
MARY BETH: Well, sir, we certainly appreciate your attitude. Mr. Gelband, you get some rest and we'll talk to you later.
GELBAND: All right.
CHRISTINE: Listen, if Darryl Stokes should try and contact you and intimidate you in any way, (giving him a card) I'd like you to call me.

[Hospital corridor]

MARY BETH: What did I tell ya? It's a dead-bang case.
CHRISTINE: OK, you're right. Stop gloating.

[Interview room]

(the Squad is sitting around in a circle)
DR. SARAH DAVIS: We've broken down the Squad into small groups of people who work closely together. You all know each other well. What you can't say out there you're free to say in here. There's no rank in this room. (Samuels spreads his hands) What is important to know is that there's nothing wrong with talking about the problem. Nothing wrong with having problems. It doesn't make you any less a person, or any less a cop. (Isbecki fidgets) Now, for starters, why don't you tell me what a ...typical day in this Precinct is like? (they all look at one another) It looks like attending this Group is going to be more stressful than your job. So who'd like to start?
(Samuels points to La Guardia. La Guardia points to Samuels)
DR. SARAH DAVIS: Sir, why don't you begin?
(La Guardia winks and nods to Samuels)
SAMUELS: My day is (a long pause) usually er... Well, I usually start my day... ...I get a jelly doughnut usually from a little place across the street. That's the first...
MARY BETH: They have a good jelly doughnut there. Everything is very fresh. Especially the custard.
SAMUELS: The custard is good too.
MARY BETH: They have a good cherry tart too. Oh, I'm sorry. It's not my turn to talk, right?
DR. SARAH DAVIS: Oh no, Mary Beth, that's OK. The idea is to talk whenever you have something to say.
MARY BETH: Well... (a pause) Um... ...That's really all I had to say.
DR. SARAH DAVIS: Anyone else have anything they'd like talk about.
ISBECKI: Yeah, I've got something I've been wanting to get off my cheat for a log time now.
DR. SARAH DAVIS: Yes, Victor.
ISBECKI: I think Barry Manilow is an underrated performer. (the others look bored) Maybe he's not hip or highbrow, but he sings the songs the whole world thinks. ...I used to like Vic Damone. ...Now there's a voice.

[Laceys' bedroom]

(Mary Beth is in the bathroom)
HARVEY: I don't understand why you're so gung-ho about this Group Encounter thing.
MARY BETH: (coming in) Well, I wouldn't say I was gung-ho, I just said it's a good idea that's all. (putting perfume behind her ears) You can't help people who keep their feelings all bottled up.
HARVEY: I thought you shared your feelings with me, Mary Beth.
MARY BETH: I do, Harve.
HARVEY: Yeah, well, it seems to me, if you've got a problem, you should talk to me about it.
MARY BETH: Oh, honey there's nothing wrong with talking about what I'm going through with people who are going through the same thing. You understand that. Right?
HARVEY: Yeah, yeah, I guess er... You're just gonna be talking about police work then, right?
MARY BETH: I don't know if it'll only be about that.
HARVEY: You're gonna be talking about me and the kids?!
MARY BETH: That could come up. Yeah.
HARVEY: Oh no, Mary Beth, I don't want you talking about me in front of strangers.
MARY BETH: They're the people I work with, Harve, they're not strangers.
HARVEY: Not to you, but to me they're strangers, Mary Beth. There are certain things between a husband and a wife that should not be talked about in front of other people.
MARY BETH: Like what?
HARVEY: What do you mean, 'Like what?.
MARY BETH: (kneeling up on the bed provocatively) Like this.
HARVEY: Like our sex life.
MARY BETH: (giggling) Why would I want to talk to anybody about our sex life?
HARVEY: Well, that's exactly my point! (collapsing giggling) Well, what's so funny?!
MARY BETH: Do you think I should tell them about that time we went to the Halloween party. Remember? You dressed up like a frog. (he stalks round to the other side of the bed) Do you remember when we got home?
HARVEY: I'm very tired, Mary Beth.
MARY BETH: Oh, you were so tired. You were too tired to change out of your costume, but not too tired to hop over my side of the bed. Right?
HARVEY: I don't think that's funny! (he puts out the light) Good night.
MARY BETH: Harve?
HARVEY: What?
(Mary Beth moves over to Harvey's side of the bed making frog sounds. He replies. She makes more frog sounds and they snuggle up)

[Detectives' Squad room]

SAMUELS: (he comes in followed by the dog) I've just got a call a call from the hospital. The nurse went into Martin Gelband's room this morning and (the dog puts it's paws up on Mary Beth's desk and wines) found him gone.
CHRISTINE: Did anyone see him leave?
SAMUELS: No, you better go over there, also check his apartment out, see what you can find.

[Squad car]

CHRISTINE: How many people didn't see Martin Gelband around and see him leave? ...Mary Beth, we don't have a witness.
MARY BETH: We have one very good witness. You.

[Gelband's apartment]

ALICE ASINOW: Marty came home about one o'clock in the morning.
CHRISTINE: Are you sure of the time?
ALICE ASINOW: Oh, positive. I was watching "Wait Until Dark" . You know Richard Kramer and Jack Weston were trying to warn Audrey Hepburn about that maniac, Alan Arkin. That's when I heard the noise in the hall.
MARY BETH: What noise, ma'am?
ALICE ASINOW: Well, I tried to wake my husband first, 'cos he was asleep next to me in the couch. I mean, it's like that every night. Every single night! I don't care what the movie. A spy movie. A tear-jerker. Cowboys and indians. Ten minutes into it, he's out cold.
MARY BETH: And about the noise, ma'am? Oh, well, I knew Marty was in the hospital, so I thought that someone might be robbing his place. I looked in the peephole, but it was only Marty walking into his apartment. The point is, they sure let 'em out of the hospital soon these days. Listen, Audrey Hepburn is blind in this picture...
CHRISTINE: I remember the picture. About the noise?
ALICE ASINOW: Well, it was just the slamming of a door. But by then Audrey had almost knifed Alan, so I figured I was safe. I walked to the door, keeping one eye on the TV, of course.
CHRISTINE: Oh, of course.
ALICE ASINOW: And when I opened the door, Alan lunged at Audrey. I let out such a scream that my husband fell off the couch. I guess I scared poor Marty to death because he just picked up the suitcase and left. You should have seen the look on Audrey Hepburn's face.
MARY BETH: Was he alone, Mrs. Asinow?
ALICE ASINOW: Who?
CHRISTINE/MARY BETH: Mr. Gelband!
ALICE ASINOW: Oh.

[Manhattan street]

CHRISTINE: He is scared, Mary Beth. He is scared and he is running.
MARY BETH: Do you think Stokes got to him?
CHRISTINE: Who else? It's his MO, isn't it? Stokes calls Gelband over at the hospital and says if he doesn't keep his mouth shut he'll cut him for ribbons or words to that effect. Gelband runs. Stokes is a pretty scary guy.
MARY BETH: What do you mean 'Scary'?
CHRISTINE: Well, he's about six foot two, weighs about two hundred pounds and he doesn't have a particularly pleasant personality.
MARY BETH: Is there something you're not telling me here?
CHRISTINE: No! Well, he was mouthing off in the precinct. He says this stuff to me about the rest of my life. An unbelievable guy.
MARY BETH: Christine, did this man threaten you directly?

[Samuels' office]

CHRISTINE: Mary Beth, you cannot take every threat seriously.
MARY BETH: Christine, you cannot pretend...
SAMUELS: I haven't got time for this kind of argument. This man is suspected of harassing witnesses. (to Chris) You're gonna be protected until I know differently. Like it or not.
CHRISTINE: Lieutenant, please...
SAMUELS: There's no more discussion, please. (to Mary Beth) You take the Squad car and drop her home tonight. I'll have two men waiting outside her loft.
MARY BETH: Happy to, sir. (to Chris) Keys please.
(as the duo leaves, the dog barks, comes in, sits down and wines)

[Chris's loft]

(Chris is sitting doing a crossword, she hears a car horn and goes to the window and sees a patrol car outside. The phone goes. Chris jumps)
CHRISTINE: (into phone) Hello. ...No, I'm sorry. There's no one here by that name. ...Say why don't you use the phone book?
(as she sits down to resume doing her crossword, the phone goes again)
CHRISTINE: (shouts into phone) Did you dial right?! ...What? ...Oh. Mark, I'm sorry. No. I thought it was a wrong number. ...I what? ...Oh well, it's just been a sort of rough day. ...Yeah. ...When, tonight? ...Er, I'd love to but... ,,,The place is a mess now and er, I'm in the middle of redecorating. ...Yeah. ...The truth is, Mark, I'm just... I'm not ...so comfy tonight. ...Yeah, another time'll be great. ...OK. Yeah. ...Good-bye.
(she looks to see if the patrol car is still there)

[Detectives' Squad room]

MARY BETH: (into phone) No, ma'am. ...Well, if we hear from him, we'll certainly let you know. ...OK. ...Thank you, Mrs. Gelband.

[Samuels' office]

(the duo knocks on the door and opens it. The dog barks)
SAMUELS: Don't let that (the dog comes in and sits down) ...dog in.
CHRISTINE: Sorry, sir.
MARY BETH: We've been on the phone to Martin Gelband's parents. They haven't heard from him since Christmas.
CHRISTINE: We're checking all transportation that left the city.
SAMUELS: Not necessary anymore. I've just got a call from the Medical Examiner. Gelband's body was found in an alley this morning. We've got an APB on Stokes now. The Homicide Squad's handling the investigation and they'll let us know anything they find. (to Chris) In the meantime I suggest that you concentrate on making your case against Stokes stick. Because if we can't tie this murder to Stokes then ...all we've got to put him away with is your case. And I assure you the DA is gonna want a lot more than your testimony. What we need is more witnesses.
CHRISTINE: Well, Uniforms have taken all the witnesses' statements, and nobody saw anything.
SAMUELS: Go on back out there. Keep on interviewing. Somebody might change their mind.
MARY BETH: Yes sir. (after Chris has left) Lieutenant, shouldn't some body notify Gelband's parents?
SAMUELS: Oh, that's a good idea. You do that, Lacey.
MARY BETH: Yes sir.
(the dog sits there and wines)
SAMUELS: Out! (dog wines again) Out!! (and again) You're sitting there good too.

[Manhattan street]

(outside the stereo store, Chris shouts, trying to attract the attention of a street worker operating a pneumatic drill. In the end she taps on his hardhat. He stops drilling)
CHRISTINE: (shouting) Did you see the stabbing that happened here Tuesday around eleven-thirty? (he takes his hardhat and ear mufflers off. She continues to shout) I said 'Did you happen to see the stabbing...' (quietening down) '...that happened here Tuesday around eleven-thirty?
STREET WORKER: No.
(he puts his ear mufflers and hard hat back on)
CHRISTINE: Oh. Thank you.
MARY BETH: (to newsvendor) Let me understand this. A man is being stabbed less than thirty feet away from you. Now surely you remember hearing or seeing something.
NEWSVENDOR: Things like that happen all the time. I don't see things. I mind my own business. ...Do you want a paper?
MARY BETH: No. Thank you.

[Squad car]

(Mary Beth returns. Chris is sitting there staring straight ahead)
MARY BETH: What?
CHRISTINE: Nothing. Like it never happened. How about you?
MARY BETH: It always amazes me the effort people take to avoid getting involved.
CHRISTINE: We wouldn't be going through this at all if they hadn't let him out on bail in the first place.

[Interview room]

DR. SARAH DAVIS: One of the most stressful aspects of police work is the inability to turn the job off once you get home. Let's talk about that tonight. Marcus, do you wanna start?
PETRIE: Hm. Some nights I get home and I er, look at Lauren, that's my daughter, and I get angry that she's gonna grow up in the world I just left. I almost wanna quit and move to Colorado.
COLEMAN: I know what you mean. The first time I had pictures taken of my daughter, I called them mug shots.
(there's a general ripple of amusement)
PETRIE: Coleman, I didn't even know you had a daughter.
COLEMAN: You never asked. ...Her name's Betty. ...She's retarded. She goes to a special school.
PETRIE: I'm sorry.
COLEMAN: No need to be. She's a lot happier than a lot of kids I've seen.
(later Chris is tearing a plastic cup that she had been holding into small pieces)
ISBECKI: I love parties. I hardly ever get invited anymore. People start smoking dope or something, ...I've gotta leave. What am I gonna do? Bust my friends?
SAMUELS: I ended up going to parties a long time ago. It's hard for me to be around people who aren't cops.
(later Chris is still fiddling with the remains of the cup)
LA GUARDIA: When my daughter was little she wanted me to wear my uniform all the time. Watching TV. On my day off. When she was old enough to understand what a policeman does, she didn't want me to wear the uniform at all.
PETRIE: Claudia tells everyone not to call when I'm working. It scares her to hear the phone ring when I'm not there. That's crazy, isn't it?
MARY BETH: No! Harvey's the same thing. We have this understanding that if I'm on stake out or something late at night, I never tell him when I'm coming home, you know, so that he won't wait up all night. Which he does anyway.
DR. SARAH DAVIS: Chris? (still fiddling with what's left of the cup) You've said very little since we began these sessions. Maybe you'd like to add something to this.
CHRISTINE: No, not really.
DR. SARAH DAVIS: No one's gonna force you to say anything that you don't want to.
CHRISTINE: Fine.
MARY BETH: Her and I are working on a very frustrating case right now. Um. None of the witnesses wanna get involved. You know, the usual. And er, we think that maybe the suspect is watching Christine.
CHRISTINE: It's no big deal!
DR. SARAH DAVIS: That can be very frightening.
CHRISTINE: I'll tell you what it is. It's a drag. Every time I turn around, I've got somebody watching me. Perp or cops. ...It's doing a number on my social life.
DR. SARAH DAVIS: Are you sure that's all you feel about it? People who've experienced that type of thing often talk of feeling invaded. Even raped.
CHRISTINE: Talking about me? What's in a word? 'Cos he's not gonna touch me. Because if he comes within three feet of me, I'll kill him. I swear to you, I'll kill him. ...Nobody does that to me. (looking at Isbecki) Nobody.
(Samuels folds his arms tighter)

[Chris's loft]

(Chris, in her pyjamas, puts a book down and goes to the fridge and gets some milk out. Just as she is pouring it into a glass, she hears a sound. Getting her gun she goes to the door. She looks through the peephole, opens the door, checks the corridor and comes back in, locking the door. She picks up the milk and goes and sits on the bed, gun in hand. She then sees a shadow over the skylight. She leaps up, the shadow moves away and she goes out into the corridor and on to the roof)

[Chris's loft building roof]

(she circles the skylight)
CHRISTINE: Freeze!
PETRIE: (with gun drawn) It's me! Petrie!
CHRISTINE: Spooks.
PETRIE: Are you OK?
CHRISTINE: Yeah. I'm fine. There was this...
ISBECKI: (running up) Petrie! He's gone.
CHRISTINE: Well, how the hell did he get past you anyway?!
PETRIE: I'm sorry.
CHRISTINE: Do you wanna coffee?
PETRIE: Come on, we'll walk you back down.
ISBECKI: (spotting an empty take-away container by the skylight) Hey, look a this. Looks like he's been here a while.
(Chris stalks back to the door to the roof)
CHRISTINE: (shouts) Do you want coffee or not?!

[Samuels' office]

(the dog is laying by his desk)
COLEMAN: Excuse me, Lieutenant, there's someone here to see you.
(a young kid comes in. The dog barks and leaps up to him)
SAMUELS: So this dog belongs to you, huh?
BOY: Yep. Stay, Ralph.
SAMUELS: You know you could have lost him for good?
BOY: He was outside the candy store when I went in to buy some comics. When I came out, he was gone.
SAMUELS: If he was wearing dog tags, we could have called you. Now, you make sure you get him a tag. 'Cos this dog is your responsibility. You know he can't take care of himself. That's why he needs you. Now, next time you may not be so lucky. Do you understand me? ...He should be wearing a collar. ...Does he have a collar?
BOY: No.
SAMUELS: (goes to his desk, gets out a brown bag and takes out a collar) Here.
BOY: Thanks.
SAMUELS: I don't suppose he has a leash either. (the boy shakes his head) I didn't think so. Here, take this one.
BOY: Thanks.
SAMUELS: Here, take the whole bag. There's a rubber bone in there (the boy tries the bone. It whistles) and some dog treats.
BOY: Thanks.
SAMUELS: Don't mention it. (as the boy leaves) Now, you make sure you take good care of that dog. You got it?
BOY: Got it.

[Detectives' Squad room]

SAMUELS: Homicide report on Gelband. There's nothing to tie Stokes to his murder.
CHRISTINE: So I'm the only one we've got to play the game, Lieutenant?
SAMUELS: All we've got is your testimony, Cagney, and if that doesn't go down, Stokes walks. By the way, last night's incident was pretty stupid.
CHRISTINE: He was on my roof, Lieutenant! I had to do something.
SAMUELS: If I wanted you to do something, then I wouldn't have put Petrie and Isbecki on ya.
CHRISTINE: Well, I didn't feel like waiting around to get carved up!
SAMUELS: So, you preferred making yourself visible? Nice easy target. Right?
CHRISTINE: I am a cop.
SAMUELS: Not in this case, you're not. In this case you're a witness, and right now, Cagney, you're the only witness that we've got, so please try and remember that!
MARY BETH: What was that all about?
CHRISTINE: It was nothing.
MARY BETH: Don't tell me 'Nothing'!
CHRISTINE: Stokes was on my roof last night and he got away. There's nothing more to tell.
MARY BETH: And you didn't call me.
CHRISTINE: It was late.
MARY BETH: That never stopped you before!
CHRISTINE: Mary Beth, I just don't wanna make a big deal out of it.
MARY BETH: The crazy who's trying to kill you was on your roof and you don't wanna make a big deal out! Thanks a lot, Christine!
CHRISTINE: Isbecki and Petrie were there. They scared him away.
MARY BETH: Oh! ha. ...So? How long you gonna keep up the strong and silent routine?
CHRISTINE: (getting up) Don't start, Mary Beth.
MARY BETH: (following her) Don't tell me 'Don't start', Christine.
CHRISTINE: Mary Beth, I know what it is you want to say to me. You want to talk to me about always being closed up and I should open up and talk to somebody. Right?
MARY BETH: Close.
CHRISTINE: Well, not everybody deals with their problems the way that you do, Mary Beth. I am not you. I do not need to talk about everything. What I need is to stop making this case any bigger than it has already become. I'm fine, and I'm really OK. What I need is to find this guy and go back to leading a normal life. That's all. OK?
(she picks up her coat and leaves. Samuels, talking to Petrie, has been watching)

[Precinct House yard]

(Chris is standing there. Samuels comes out followed by Mary Beth, Petrie and Isbecki)
SAMUELS: Cagney, have you got plans for dinner tonight? ...So go and have dinner with Lacey.
(the four go back inside leaving Chris standing there)

[Squad car]

ISBECKI: (eating a hot dog) So where did La Guardia get this one?
PETRIE: Nineteen fifty-seven, in Greenpoint.
ISBECKI: We are talking a long shot here.
PETRIE: Oh, here they come.
(Chris and Mary Beth come out of Cole's restaurant)

[Outside Cole's restaurant]

MARY BETH: Isn't that a good one?
CHRISTINE: I don't know, my taste buds are still in shock.
MARY BETH: I told you to get the mild one. You still liked it?
CHRISTINE: I think it's the finest in New York City. How did you find this place.
MARY BETH: Oh, Harve found it. You know, he can sniff out food like nobody's business.
CHRISTINE: I know he can. (just then a man pushes past her) Hey!
(he floors her with a punch in the face)
MARY BETH: Hey, you creep!
(the man struggles with Mary Beth and pitches her into a pile of rubbish)
MARY BETH: Petrie! Isbecki! Get after him!
CHRISTINE: (feeling her mouth) Oh my God!
MARY BETH: Christine, are you all right? Let me see. Oh, geeze!
CHRISTINE: (shaking her head and speaking through thick lips) I'm fine. I'm fine.
MARY BETH: (getting out a handkerchief) Just a second.
CHRISTINE: Damn it!
MARY BETH: Here, here, take this.
CHRISTINE: Would you believe that? Louse.
MARY BETH: Christine, are you all right?
CHRISTINE: Yeah, I'm OK. Let me walk it off.
MARY BETH: (helping her up) OK. Take it easy now.
CHRISTINE: I'm fine.
MARY BETH: Are you sure you're gonna be OK?
CHRISTINE: Yeah, I'm fine.
MARY BETH: I'm gonna call it in.
CHRISTINE: Fine.
(Chris goes back into the restaurant. Stokes appears round the corner)

[Cole's restaurant]

(Stokes follows Chris through the restaurant to the rest rooms)

[Ladies room]

(Chris is leaning over the hand basin washing blood out of her mouth. Stokes, with knife drawn, quietly comes in)
LA GUARDIA: (kicks open the door of a WC with his gun already drawn) Hold it! Right there!
(the door into the Ladies room is kicked open. Mary Beth and Isbecki are there with guns drawn)
MARY BETH: Put the knife down, Stokes. ...Lay it down.
(Chris has her gun drawn)
ISBECKI: Drop it!
(Stokes puts the knife down and Isbecki slams him against the wall and cuffs him)
CHRISTINE: (quietly and with her gun in Stokes' face) You have the right to remain silent. If you give up the right to remain silent, anything you say can be held against you in a court of law. You have the right to an attorney and to have an attorney present during questioning. If you cannot afford one, and so choose, an attorney will be appointed for you without charge before questioning. Do you understand those rights as I have told them to you.
(Mary Beth puts the knife into an evidence bag)

[Interview room]

(there is a general air of joviality)
ISBECKI: You should have been there. It was great. We set this guy up like you wouldn't believe.
MARY BETH: Christine and I came out of this restaurant and this guy tried to grab for her pocket book, and then he winded up hitting her. Right in the mouth!
PETRIE: That punch looked so good.
CHRISTINE: (to Samuels, still laughing and pointing to her lips) He thought he'd hit me! Where did you get this guy?!
SAMUELS: From Vice. They make the best crooks.
(general laughter)
MARY BETH: Christine was wonderful. You were wonderful. She never even batted an eye. She never gave it away. She was spectacular.
CHRISTINE: I didn't do anything! It was all La Guardia. He sorted it out. (clapping loudly) Let's hear it for La Guardia!
(they all clap)
CHRISTINE: (to Samuels as Dr. Sarah Davis looks on) You should have seen the look on Stokes' face.
LA GUARDIA: He couldn't believe his eyes. A nice guy like me in the Ladies room!
(the laughing eventually subsides, except for Chris)
CHRISTINE: I'm sorry. (laughing) It was so funny. I'm just sort of glad it's over.
(more laughter)
DR. SARAH DAVIS: Go on.
CHRISTINE: (breaking down) Well, I just kept seeing ...his face in my mind, you know, and I ...just waited. There was nothing else I do except wait. And I er, felt er, very helpless. It's like I lost all sense of... That I had no control. He had taken that away from me. ...Do you know, he had no right to invade my life the way he did. Nobody... Nobody has that right. ...Er, um. It's my life. .. ...It's my life. ...I hate... I hate er, feeling scared and er, there wasn't anything I could do about it! I just... I can't stop thinking about... about it... I just hate him for that. I just... I just wanna get the picture out of my mind and I need to go on ...with my life. Is that too much to ask.

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