American Dream
Original Airdate: January 7, 1985

(at night a Garment District factory is on fire)

[Detectives' Squad room]

SEYMOUR: So you tell me, dear, why would I burn down my own factory?
CHRISTINE: How's business, Mr. Seymour?
SEYMOUR: Don't ask.
MARY BETH: (bringing coffees back) Cream, two sugars.
SEYMOUR: Thank you. (fingering Mary Beth's chin as she sits down) Mm. You've got such a punim. Do you know what a punim is?
MARY BETH: Yes sir. Thank you.
CHRISTINE: I am asking, Mr. Seymour, 'How's business?'.
SEYMOUR: For twenty-five years stocks go up, hemlines go up. Stocks down, hemlines down. It was easy. Well, ...not so easy. Now? Now there's minis and maxis, above the knee, below the knee. Who can guess this mushagana business?
CHRISTINE: So this nice, convenient fire solved a lot of your problems?
SEYMOUR: Nice? The insurance companies, those gannets, don't pay up without the say so 'I didn't do it'. And now you two ladies are giving me the third degree. Nice. Very nice.
MARY BETH: What my partner is saying, sir, is that eventually you will get the money.
SEYMOUR: And you think money's gonna do it? Money makes up for forty-three years of sweat and blood?
MARY BETH: Mr. Seymour, the Fire Department says it was definitely arson.
SEYMOUR: Why should I do such a thing?! I had a wonderful line coming out.
CHRISTINE: Well, if you didn't do it, who did?
SEYMOUR: (shiftily) I don't know.
CHRISTINE: Excuse me, Mr. Seymour, you seem a nice man, but you're a terrible liar.
SEYMOUR: Excuse me back, detective lady, I'm a terrific liar. I've been in this schmuck business for forty-three years.
MARY BETH: OK, Mr. Seymour, you are not lying. You don't know who it is, but you've a pretty good suspicion. Am I right?
CHRISTINE: Who are you protecting, Mr. Seymour?
SEYMOUR: You know, I got great-grandchildren, two of them, and eight grandchildren, all from three daughters and a wife. Who am I protecting? A business you can rebuild. A family... ...If I tell ya the names, that's the end of the story. I don't sign nothing. I don't go testifying. Otherwise ...I came into this world with nothing. I can go out the same way.

[Samuels' office]

CHRISTINE: He claims that some company called Ashland Trucking is trying to take over the delivery business for the whole Garment District. No ones saying anything outright, but three fires later, they're getting the idea.
MARY BETH: It looks like there could be something to it. Nelson Ashland's been in the business a little over a year now. He already gobbled up a good chunk of the trade and nobody wants to say how.
SAMUELS: Organised Crime?
CHRISTINE: Well we ran the name past OCCB but they've never heard of him.
SAMUELS: So all you've got is a situation that smells hicky and a story from this Seymour character. He doesn't wanna cooperate?
MARY BETH: He gave us a name. That's all we've got. Plus he's an old man. He wants to retire and spend some more time with his great-grandchildren.
SAMUELS: Well, what do you want from me?
CHRISTINE: Twenty-four hours surveillance on Nelson Ashland.
SAMUELS: Well, come on Cagney, that's three sets of detectives. Six men off the duty roster on the word of a man who may be covering up his own handiwork.
CHRISTINE: I believe him.
MARY BETH: So do I, sir.
SAMUELS: All right. So I'll think about it. In the meantime, if I recall, you two are still bringing up the rear of this Squad when it comes to paperwork. I think you've got forty-five minutes 'til shift change. ...How about it!
MARY BETH: Yes sir.
SAMUELS: Good.
CHRISTINE: Well...
SAMUELS: Well ...yeah. I'll talk to Knelman about the surveillance.
CHRISTINE: Thank you, Lieutenant.

[Detectives' Squad room]

(there is a large notice on the wall. 'SERGEANT'S EXAM. ODD'S SHEET)
LA GUARDIA: The Sergeant's Exam! Coleman, you'll make book on anything, won't you?
COLEMAN: Come on, LaGuardia, it's a natural. You have Petrie going out at three to two. He's the odds-on favourite.
LA GUARDIA: What about Cagney and Lacey?
COLEMAN: I've got them both at four to one. No way two women from the same Squad are gonna make sergeant. The way I figure, the one sort of offsets the other, you know.
ISBECKI: What about me?!
COLEMAN: Seven to one.
ISBECKI: Seven to one?! What? Are you kidding?
COLEMAN: It takes more than a pretty face, Isbecki.
ISBECKI: Obviously, if you made it.
COLEMAN: Sticks and stones, Isbecki, sticks and stones. Wanna put your money where your mouth is?
ISBECKI: Well, not at those odds. It's ridiculous. It's insulting. Hey, I've got as good a chance as Cagney and Lacey.
COLEMAN: Hey, hey, hey. Let me get this straight. Are you saying that if I give you four to one, you'll bet.
LA GUARDIA: Careful, Victor.
ISBECKI: It's OK, La Guardia. Four to one.
COLEMAN: As opposed to seven to one. Right? Hey, Isbecki, you drive a hard bargain. I guess you're right. Do you know what Sarah said? What do you want? Ten bucksworth?
ISBECKI: Make it fifty.
(Isbecki leaves)
COLEMAN: That's why he's seven to one!
(Chris is just leaving as Harvey comes in)
HARVEY: Oh, oh, Christine, where's Mary Beth?
CHRISTINE: Harvey, what are you doing here?!
HARVEY: I can't talk to you now. Where's Mary Beth?
CHRISTINE: She's over in the records files.
(he rushes across the room)
ISBECKI: What's Harvey doing here?
CHRISTINE: Harvey's wearing a suit. He only wears suits for funerals.
(Mary Beth comes out the files room. Harvey embraces her and they start jumping around in a circle)
CHRISTINE: It probably wasn't a close friend.

[Restaurant]

HARVEY: Ernie. He's been joking with me for six years about me getting out of manual labour and into real money. Only he doesn't mean it because he doesn't think I can do anything else. Only now I've put together this contracting thing, I've proved myself. So we've been talking. Today he puts it on the line. ...I start Monday.
MARY BETH: Oh, Harve, that's wonderful. (she reaches across the table and shakes his hand) Wonderful. Harve, what do you know about tax shelters?
HARVEY: I'm a businessman, Mary Beth. It's business. I mean, earning isn't exactly Albert Einstein, you know. Honey, I mean, if he can do it and make that kind of money, why not me?
MARY BETH: Why not?
(a waiter arrives with wine and glasses)
HARVEY: Hey, Chris, how are you?
CHRIS: Hello, Mr. Lacey.
HARVEY: How's your family?
CHRIS: Fine.
HARVEY: (tasting the wine) Good.
MARY BETH: (to Chris) Thank you.
CHRIS: You're welcome.
MARY BETH: (as they raise their glasses) Harve, did you notice how much this wine is on the menu?
HARVEY: A night to be extravagant. (they drink a toast) In fact, Mary Beth, I'll tell you what. Make a wish.
MARY BETH: A wish? What kind of a wish?
HARVEY: Something you've always wanted but we couldn't afford.
MARY BETH: Harve, I don't need anything.
HARVEY: I wanna buy you a present.
MARY BETH: Oh, honey.
HARVEY: I mean it. Tell me something I can buy you. A present. A big one. ...Come on! You've got something. Tell me.
MARY BETH: A new refrigerator.
HARVEY: Oh, come on.
MARY BETH: Harvey, we really need a new refrigerator.
HARVEY: Oh, come on, not something that we need but something you want.
MARY BETH: OK. ... How about... ...No, it's too much.
HARVEY: What is it? Tell me what is it that's too much?
MARY BETH: (reaching out with her left hand to hold his right) An engagement ring. ...I never really cared, Harve, you know, because the wedding ring was plenty, but something I always wanted, ...an engagement ring. A small one.
(he kisses her ring finger and then takes off her wedding ring and puts it in his shirt pocket)
HARVEY: (raising his glass again) To the lady who is still my fiancée.
(they toast again and Mary Beth kisses his left hand)

[Manhattan street]

MARY BETH: You should see the size of the office that he's gonna get. Well the office is not so big, but the desk he's got is the size of a site box.
CHRISTINE: Oh, it sounds so terrific. So are you guys gonna celebrate this weekend?
MARY BETH: I don't know. Muriel's taking the kids for Saturday, so we'll try and do the usual, you know.
CHRISTINE: Haw, haw, ...ha, ha, Mary Beth.
MARY BETH: What?
CHRISTINE: How many times do you get a Saturday alone together?
MARY BETH: No, not that, Christine. ...We might do that too. ...But probably we'll just go for a drive.
CHRISTINE: Ha, ha, ha. Well, that's OK. So where you going? Where to?
MARY BETH: Nowhere. Just a drive. Harve likes to drive and sometimes we stop ...and look at houses.
CHRISTINE: But you're not going anywhere!
MARY BETH: What, you never just get in a car and drive?
CHRISTINE: No, I think that's very boring. It's like window-shopping.
MARY BETH: Oh, come on Christine, I've seen you window-shop.
CHRISTINE: Only when I'm trying to kill time, otherwise I figure what it is I want, and then I set out to find it.
MARY BETH: Well, we stop and look at houses, and then we imagine if we lived there, you know.
CHRISTINE: I'd find it very frustrating.
MARY BETH: (as Chris peers into a shop window) You never look at a dress and imagine what it would be like on?
CHRISTINE: Yeah, sure I do! If I like it, I buy it.
MARY BETH: That's the difference between you and me, Christine.
CHRISTINE: What, patience?
MARY BETH: Money.
CHRISTINE: Ah, that's very good, Mary Beth. ...Almost a joke. (looking at her watch) We've gotta run down those two new witnesses and Samuels wants us back by three. That's not a joke.

[Samuels' office]

(there are six detectives there. La Guardia is partnered by Marty Pappas)
SAMUELS: Twenty-four hour surveillance starting Monday morning. Cagney and Lacey copped the case so they're in charge. You'll report to them and they'll report to me. Everyday, because I wanna know everything. I wanna know everything that Nelson Ashland does and everyone he sees.
PETRIE: A warrant, sir?
SAMUELS: No, we haven't got enough for a court order.
CHRISTINE: What kind of vehicles do we get?
SAMUELS: Regular unmarked Squad cars.
CHRISTINE: Lieutenant, we're supposed to keep tabs on a possible major strong-arm guy and you want us to do it in open cars.
SAMUELS: You've just used the word yourself, Cagney. 'Possible'. This is the best I can get out of Knelman with a 'possible'. Give me a 'probable' or even better a 'very likely' and then I'll get you the whole shooting match. Until then you've got Squad cars. That's it. Questions?
MARY BETH: How long, sir.
SAMUELS: If you don't turn anything up in a week, I'm gonna have to take a long and hard look.
ISBECKI: We've got what shift?
SAMUELS: Cagney and Lacey make the assignments.
PAPPAS: We'll take graveyard.
CHRISTINE: Oh, that's a wise decision, Marty.
SAMUELS: Can you do this somewhere else. Some of us have got work to do here.
MARY BETH: Yes sir.

[House in Queens]

(Mary Beth and Harvey are being shown round a house for sale by an estate agent)
MRS. HARKINS: And, as you know, we are back in the dining room again.
MARY BETH: Can you see it, Harve? Having a real dining room. There's candelabras on the table and I'm ladling soup from a tureen.
HARVEY: It'd be nice.
MARY BETH: Nice.
HARVEY: (to Mrs. Harkins) The place is well built.
MARY BETH: Well, er, thank you. It's a lovely home, Mrs. Har...
MRS. HARKINS: Harkins.
HARVEY: (to Mary Beth) You know, I've always wanted my own workshop.
MRS. HARKINS: It just came on the market this week. Believe me, its not gonna stay around long.
MARY BETH: I'm sure it won't. Thank you.
HARVEY: What are the terms?
MRS. HARKINS: Oh well, it's all right here on the offer sheet. A first mortgage is assumable, and with say, twenty percent down, the second is very reasonable.
HARVEY: What's the monthly payment?
MRS. HARKINS: Well, depending on the down and the interest rate on the second, it would be somewhere between (showing Harvey the offer sheet) this figure ...and this one.
MARY BETH: (trying to drag Harvey away) Thank you very much.
HARVEY: Hold on a minute, Mary Beth. Can I talk to my wife?
MRS. HARKINS: Oh, of course.
MARY BETH: Harve, I know what you're gonna say.
HARVEY: Do you like the house?
MARY BETH: No, I don't like the house. It's a wonderful house, of course.
HARVEY: I like it too. A lot.
MARY BETH: Harve. we can't afford this house.
HARVEY: I know it's a stretch, Mary Beth, but with the new job, the tax breaks we get, I think we could almost afford it.
MARY BETH: Really?
HARVEY: Yes.
MARY BETH: Are you serious?
HARVEY: Do you want me to buy the house?
MARY BETH: This house? This house here? ...Oh geeze! Oh ho! Whew!

[Laceys' kitchen]

MICHAEL: I don't wanna move!
MARY BETH: Get on and finish your breakfast.
HARVEY JR.: If I change schools I'm not gonna be able to go for basketball.
MARY BETH: Nobody's said we're moving yet.
HARVEY JR.: All my friends are here.
MICHAEL: Mm, she's nice.
HARVEY JR.: If you mention girls again I'm gonna kill you.
MARY BETH: Hey, what kind of talk is that? Harvey, will you pick up a jar of pickles on your way home from school.
HARVEY JR.: Why do I have to? How come Michael's never has to.
MICHAEL: Because I'm not old enough.
MARY BETH: Whoever goes gets extra dessert.
HARVEY: (rushing in dressed in a suit and carrying a briefcase) All right? (to the boys) Hi guys.
MARY BETH: Oh Harvey! Oh, look at you! I don't have the words for it.
HARVEY: You like it?
MARY BETH: Yeah!
HARVEY: Pretty good for off the rack, huh?
MARY BETH: Yeah.
MICHAEL: I think you look funny.
HARVEY JR.: You do, huh? Well get used to it, kiddo. Your father's in the big time.
(they peck each other and exchange small talk. Harvey goes to leave)
MARY BETH: I'll be thinking about ya. Honey! (holding up a lunch bag) You've forgotten this?
HARVEY: What is that? (he takes it gives her another peck and puts it down behind her) See you guys tonight.
MARY BETH: OK. Which one of you guys is going to the store.
MICHAEL: I'll go!
MARY BETH: Yeah? ...All of a sudden you're old enough?

[Outside of Ashland's mansion]

(the duo are on stake out)

[Squad car]

CHRISTINE: Do you think Ashland's ever gonna go to work?
MARY BETH: I don't know, Chris. (holding up the lunch bag) But I've got a couple of extra BLC on whole wheat! It's a shame to waste the lettuce.
CHRISTINE: Oh, thanks. You know, Mary Beth, your house sounds really wonderful.
MARY BETH: Oh it is. It's got this little room in the back that Harve is gonna put in a skylight for me. I could grow flowers all year long. I wouldn't mind Ashland's place here. It's gonna be nice for the four of us.
CHRISTINE: Oh, what do want with a white elephant like that? All you've got to do is wash windows all day long! Look at the lawn. I'm telling ya if that isn't Astroturf, Ashland spends every weekend behind the lawnmower.
MARY BETH: Are you making fun of me?
CHRISTINE: No.
MARY BETH: It sounds you're making fun of the house I want. I mean, it may not be a big deal with you Christine...
CHRISTINE: No, no. I'm not making fun of your house! I was just giving you a downside to ownership. I mean look at property taxes. There's maintenance.
MARY BETH: Oh, it's very easy for you to say, Christine. You own your loft.
CHRISTINE: Exactly.
MARY BETH: You've always owned the house you've lived in.
CHRISTINE: That isn't true. When I went to college, I did not. When I lived with Charlie, I did not.
MARY BETH: Oh, yeah! While you were waiting for your trust fund to come in. No, I'm sorry, Christine. No offence. You don't know what you're talking about.
CHRISTINE: Well, on the contrary, Mary Beth, I do know what I'm talking about. That's why I'm trying to advise you. You've gotta decide some...
MARY BETH: There's one thing about this country. When you're growing up, they make promises to ya. I mean, you know what they say. When you're a little girl they promise you're gonna grow up. You're gonna find a terrific man. You're gonna have terrific children. You're gonna settle down in a nice terrific house somewhere. A house you own. I know, but nobody says it, Christine, I've been feeling cheated all my life because I couldn't afford a house.
CHRISTINE: Well, that's stupid, Mary Beth. I've never had a husband. I've never had children. I do not feel cheated. My life is fine.
MARY BETH: By choice, Christine, which is the important thing. I mean a house, (pointing to Ashland's mansion) owning something like that. ...People like Harve and me, it's almost not a choice anymore. Only now we've got one. ...I don't know. (pointing to Ashland's mansion again) It's the American Dream. Right? ...It's important to me.
CHRISTINE: I'm happy for you, Mary Beth, I really am. ...And I'm sure you're having a nice house.
MARY BETH: A new beginning. Oh, we started to work the price down. We're working on a second m... Christine!

[Outside of Ashland's mansion]

(a Nassau County Police patrol car drives up and two uniformed officers get out)
COP #1: Excuse me, ladies would you mind getting out of the car?
CHRISTINE: Officer, we're Detectives Cagney and Lacey, Fourteenth Squad, New York City. I will reach into my pocket to get my ID. My partner will get out of the car and I will place my ID on the seat for your inspection.
MARY BETH: (to the other cop) Right hand pocket. We're staking out someone in that house over there.
COP #1: Mr. Ashland?
CHRISTINE: You know him?
COP #1: He's the one who called. He thought maybe you were casing the place. Planning a burglary.
(a sports coupé pulls up)
COP #1: Good morning Mr. Ashland.
ASHLAND: Thank you. ...Officers.
MARY BETH: Oh Lord.

[Detectives' Squad room]

CHRISTINE: It was embarrassing, Lieutenant. Two Nassau uniforms laughing at us like we're Keystone Cops. If we had vans or something...
SAMUELS: Cagney, I told you already, I cannot go to Knelman for more on the basis of an unsubstantiated hunch! Now give me some ammunition. You've still got a couple of days.
SAMUELS: (to another detective) Come on upstairs. I wanna talk to ya.
MARY BETH: Wanna try Mr. Seymour? Maybe he's changed his mind.
CHRISTINE: Sure. You're the one with the nice punim

[Seymour's new warehouse loft workroom]

(he is standing by a mannequin with a long coat and a shirt with a tie on it)
SEYMOUR: I call it 'The Mr. Woman's Haberdashery Look'. I woke up one morning and saw the whole line in my head. Pretty nifty, huh?
MARY BETH: Mr. Seymour, you told us you were retiring. What could I tell ya? Harry Holtz says he'll close. Says he's chucking the whole thing. Going to Miami Beach. He'll give me a deal on this place if I come in lickety split. So Freyda's Frocks is back in business.
MARY BETH: So your wife said.
CHRISTINE: Mr. Seymour, you haven't even collected on your insurance yet.
SEYMOUR: Don't worry. Don't worry, I will. I have a little something in the bank, so I'm back in the game. I already got orders from two of the biggest chains in the county.
MARY BETH: You can do it that fast?
SEYMOUR: That's the beauty of the schmuck business. A few thousand dollars, a couple of designs and a good name, and you're in business. The fabrics go to the cutting surface. The cut fabrics go to my sewing contractor. These people send me the finished dresses and the shipping contractor picks them up. All done on a handshake. A wonderful country, America.
CHRISTINE: That easy, huh?
SEYMOUR: And next month, I may be taking out a second and third mortgage on my house.
MARY BETH: You can do that?
SEYMOUR: When you want something, you do what you gotta do. Otherwise nobody's gonna give it ya.
MARY BETH: Mr. Seymour, tell me something. This time are you gonna use Ashland Trucking Company?
SEYMOUR: Who knows? I'll look 'em all over. (touching the sleeve of Chris's jacket) That's a nice coat.
CHRISTINE: Thank you.
SEYMOUR: Do you mind if I asked you how much you paid for it?
CHRISTINE: Mr. Seymour, we need your help. If you sign this statement...
SEYMOUR: (to Mary Beth) You, if you'll excuse me, need something a little more stylish. Camel's hair, maybe!
MARY BETH: Mr. Seymour, the way my partner and I see it, you've got two choices. Either you give in and you hire the crooked truckers. The gannets, thieves. Right? Which is hard to picture for you. The son of a man whose wife tells us he worked as a cutter every day of his life, even after his son could well afford to support him and retire. Or else you go up against Nelson Ashland again.
CHRISTINE: In which case you'll be asking for another fire ...or worse. So, Mr. Seymour... Oh, you ask him.
MARY BETH: (showing him the statement) Please sir.

[Laceys' kitchen]

(Harvey, with his briefcase open, is working away while Mary Beth wipes up)
MARY BETH: He's a remarkable man. Seventy-one years old.
HARVEY: Seventy-one?!
MARY BETH: Yeah, and he's excited like a kid over starting up again. Anyway now we got him as registered confidential informant, the Lieutenant's gonna try and get us in again. Two surveillance teams, twelve detectives, vans and a whole bunch of wire taps and Christine is all hacked off because it's part of a deal I made with Mr. Seymour. I promised that we would be the ones to personally watch his place, which means that Petrie gets to lead up the team that's out to catch Nelson Ashland. Anyway, she's so competitive, you know. (Harvey seems to be nodding while he works) Are you listening to me?
HARVEY: Sure. I think it's terrific, babe.
(Harvey chuckles as he continues to work)
MARY BETH: How come you're sitting there smirking like you know something?
HARVEY: Me? I don't know nothing. Oh, do you know you had dinner with a very rich man tonight?
MARY BETH: Huh?
HARVEY: Yep. Ah, I closed my first deal today.
MARY BETH: Harve!
HARVEY: I don't know how the guarantee comes off the commission, but either way it is a nice piece of change.
MARY BETH: (coming to sit on his lap) I thought it was gonna take a while.
HARVEY: Ernie says he doesn't believe it. I'm telling you, Mary Beth, this stuff is easy. I've learnt a couple of catchwords and ...bang! These people sit around and listen to me like I'm doing magic tricks.
MARY BETH: (wiggling on his lap) This person, huh?
HARVEY: Me!
MARY BETH: (playing with his tie) Do you mean I have to sleep with a wheeler-dealer?
HARVEY: I didn't tell you the best part here. This guy named Foster, he is about to confirm tomorrow an even bigger deal.
MARY BETH: (pecking him a couple of times) Do you know what I think?
HARVEY: What do you think?
MARY BETH: That this calls for a proper celebration. Do you wanna join me in the bedroom?
HARVEY: Oh. I wish I could, Mary Beth, but I've gotta finish my paperwork.
MARY BETH: Oh, OK.
HARVEY: Yeah.
MARY BETH: (as she kisses his ear) Is it gonna take long?
HARVEY: Well, er ...when I'm done ...I'm done. Why don't you go in now and er, I'll join you later? OK?
MARY BETH: (as she goes to the bedroom) I might be asleep.
HARVEY: Well, I'll be quiet so I won't wake you.
MARY BETH: Harve, ...if you wanna wake me. ...wake me. ...OK?
(getting no response, she throws the tea towel at him)
HARVEY: Good night.

[Unmarked car]

(the duo is on stakeout in the yard of the warehouse where Seymour's new loft is. A man wearing glasses and with his collar up, walks past. Chris has a camera and takes a shot)
MARY BETH: Get him?
CHRISTINE: Yeah. If we a had wire attached we'd know who we were taking pictures of. (about the camera) This stupid thing. I'd better take some shots of this building.
MARY BETH: One more piece of evidence. That's what the Lieutenant said. Then he's gonna have to gives us the right equipment. Wanna a coffee?
CHRISTINE: No, it might keep me awake.
(Chris continues to take photos)
MARY BETH: Harve closed his first deal yesterday. Got another suit. Three-piecer with a vest. (Chris chuckles) What?
CHRISTINE: No, it's nice! I don't know. It's just hard to picture Harvey in a three-piece suit.
(they are parked opposite a large lorry with 'JACKSON TRUCKING LTD.' on the side)
MARY BETH: Why?
CHRISTINE: I don't know. It doesn't fit. You know, there are some things that fit. Old Harve! I just can't see him in a three-piece suit.
MARY BETH: Do you know what I think? I think you've got a prejudice ..against men who are blue-collar, Christine.
CHRISTINE: Oh, come on, Mary Beth, that is being stupid.
MARY BETH: Yeah? Have you ever dated one? In the last ten years have you ever gone out with a man who did not wear ties and collars?
CHRISTINE: I don't remember.
MARY BETH: I rest my case.
CHRISTINE: That does not mean I'm prejudiced!
MARY BETH: I'm not making a value judgement here, Christine, I'm just explaining about an observation. That's all.
CHRISTINE: Mm hm. (taking a shot of the man with the glasses who's talking to men with the Jackson Trucking lorry) There he is. ...Did you make another offer on the house? (Mary Beth just smiles) Mary Beth? Did they accept?!
MARY BETH: I'm very superstitious about things like this, Christine. We've got sixty days and I'm going crazy every night about mortgage rates.
CHRISTINE: Oh, that is terrific!
MARY BETH: No! It didn't happen yet and it could fall through and I don't wanna talk about it anymore. OK/
CHRISTINE: OK.
(Chris lines up a shot of Mary Beth)
MARY BETH: I haven't been so excited about anything since Michael was born. What are you doing?
CHRISTINE: Taking a picture of my partner.
MARY BETH: They're gonna develop it in the Police Lab!
CHRISTINE: If they can't take a joke, to hell with them.
MARY BETH: (as Chris takes another shot) Stop that!

[Detectives' Squad room]

(the photos are scattered on La Guardia's desk. Surveillance detectives are gathered there looking at them)
SAMUELS: I don't see anything hicky in all of this. Do you?
MARY BETH: With due respect, sir, if you were under surveillance, would you do anything incriminating, sir?
CHRISTINE: On the other hand there's not been one torch job in the Garment District in the whole time either.
SAMUELS: This can't go on indefinitely, Cagney. Crime doesn't stop just because we've got a hard case. I've got new business coming through that door every hour.
PETRIE: (handing him a photo) Well, let me show you one odd situation, Lieutenant. That's Monday, one PM, at Utah's Restaurant. It's a big-deal, Three-Martini business lunch. Ashland puts it away pretty well, right through a big dessert and coffee. He left at two forty-five, and then, (handing Samuels another photo) just twenty minutes later he goes to another restaurant. He stops at the Cup-of-Coffee coffee shop, Sixteenth and Seventh, reads the afternoon paper and has another cup of coffee.
SAMUELS: Did he talk to anybody?
ISBECKI: (handing over another photo) Well, there this is one. To him, two stools away. He stayed ten minutes for a breakfast and off.
PETRIE: That's his only break from routine all week.
SAMUELS: Anybody? ...OK, La Guardia, finish cataloguing these pictures, and Pappas, I wanna see an exit plan on my desk tomorrow morning.
CHRISTINE: (as Samuels goes back to his office) Lieutenant! Lieutenant, you can't drop this investigation.
SAMUELS: Look, a cigarette stand gets knocked over for eighty bucks. All right?! That man has as much right to a detective hot on his case as anybody in the Garment District does. Probably more, because he's at least willing to cooperate.
CHRISTINE: Nelson Ashland is dirty! And everything Aaron Seymour said is true!
SAMUELS: Well, you believe that. I believe that too! But we don't have one shred of evidence here!
LA GUARDIA: Excuse me, Bert, I think we have something. Photo in the coffee shop. This fellow here. I kept thinking he looked familiar. Coleman thinks so too.
COLEMAN: Yeah, you remember that commission on organised crime a few years ago? Took the Fifth all day long. Got a record as long as your arm.
LA GUARDIA: Including arson. I just can't think of his name. Bendtner or...
COLEMAN: Faraday?
CHRISTINE: No. it isn't. It's Fennady.
LA GUARDIA: Fennady!
COLEMAN: Fennady, that's it.
CHRISTINE: Frank Fennady. Ten-to-one, Ashland left the paper and Fennady picks it up.
MARY BETH: (shaking Chris's hand) Atta girl! All right!!
(there is general jubilation amongst the detectives)
SAMUELS: (into phone) Get me Inspector Knelman. ...Lieutenant Samuels.

[Surveillance van]

(parked in warehouse yard where racks of garments are being brought in for onward transport. There is an officer, George, operating the monitoring equipment)
MARY BETH: Anybody?
CHRISTINE: Small guy in a dirty sports coat. I think he's going to the tailors on the first floor. So how's it going?
MARY BETH: I can't stand it with this music blasting in my ear, George. ...Hey, George, do we have to have that music blasting?
GEORGE: If I cut out the monitor you won't be able to hear anything else that's going on up there.
CHRISTINE: I love it. Seventy-one years old and he's into country and western music.

[Precinct House front desk]

PETRIE: Hey, hold it Victor, where you going?
ISBECKI: To lunch.
PETRIE: It's almost five.
ISBECKI: Well I'm planning to eat.
PETRIE: Wait!
ISBECKI: Hey, Bon Bon's got a free hour.
PETRIE: We take over the stake out on Fennady at six-thirty.
ISBECKI: Hey, what do you think I am? An amateur. I'll be there in plenty of time.
(Petrie kicks the candy machine, waking up Josie the bag lady)

[Surveillance van]

(Mary Beth is studying a book. She screams out)
CHRISTINE: The music getting to ya!
MARY BETH: (holding up the book) No, it's this. 'Proceedings upon felony complaints and arraignments thereon from depositions thereof'. I mean who understands this stuff? (Chris smiles) Well, you probably understand it. Does Coleman understand that stuff?
CHRISTINE: The test was probably easier when Coleman made sergeant.
MARY BETH: Sure.
VOICE: (on monitor) I'm looking for Aaron Seymour.
SEYMOUR: (on monitor) I'm Seymour. What can I do for you?
VOICE: (on monitor) Mr. Seymour, I represent Ashland Trucking.
MARY BETH: Here we go.
VOICE: (on monitor) I'm here to talk to you about your shipping needs for your new line that you're coming out with.

[Seymour's new warehouse loft workroom]

CHRISTINE: All I'm trying to get at, Mr, Seymour is, are you gonna give in or not?
SEYMOUR: Not. Now let me ask you smart young ladies something. Did you ever notice how shoddy the tailoring is on old swimming suits?
MARY BETH: I beg your pardon.
SEYMOUR: Now, take men's suits. A little hand stitching here. A little extra tailoring there. That's quality. Now say you wanna buy a nice classic, never go-out-of-style woman's suit with the same oomph. You'd love it. You'd wear it forever. You'd be happy to pay a hundred and fifty dollars. It's a shame!
MARY BETH: Could you answer my partner's question?
SEYMOUR: (going over to the mannequin) 'Mr. Woman's Haberdashery Look'. It's gonna be a monster. I can feel it in my kish kish.
CHRISTINE: In your what?!
SEYMOUR: Kish kish. (slapping his ample stomach) Guts! I'll tell you what I'm gonna do. You two ladies have been so terrific, what say I give you each a sample? For all your trouble.
MARY BETH: We can't do that!
SEYMOUR: Why not? Do you think it's a bribe? It's not a bribe. I like you.
CHRISTINE: And we like you, Mr. Seymour. And we thank you. But we just wanna do our job.
SEYMOUR: I want you should be happy. I want everybody should be happy.
CHRISTINE: Even Nelson Ashland?
SEYMOUR: (glancing at his wife who has been listening) My old mother, may she rest in peace, used to tell the story...
FREYDA SEYMOUR: Oh no.
SEYMOUR: Way back in the old country the Cossacks would come through the town hurting people. My uncle Avram one day thinks, maybe he should do a little business with them. Even Cossacks understand business. So he gives each one a chicken.
MARY BETH: Are you telling us you're gonna pay protection to the King of the Cossacks?
SEYMOUR: What can it cost me? A chicken? Ten, fifty percent extra on the shipping? This line is gonna be a monster! So I take a little less profit margin. (pointing to the duo) And I avoid a lot of tourists.
CHRISTINE: Well, Mr. Seymour,...
SEYMOUR: I wanna think about it. (he glances at his wife again) I've gotta think. ...But I ask you ladies. What would be so terrible?

[Warehouse yard in Garment District]

CHRISTINE: Do you believe that? We're sitting out like idiots and he's caving in.
MARY BETH: Not in a million years.
CHRISTINE: Mary Beth, he knows what he says.
MARY BETH: Did you see the look on Mrs. Seymour's face?
(a large sedan nearly runs into them where the surveillance van had been parked)
CHRISTINE: Hey, am I in your way?!
MARY BETH: Where's George taken my book?
CHRISTINE: 36th Street.
MARY BETH: That creep has taken our space.

[Manhattan street outside the Hotel Ulster]

(Petrie comes up to another surveillance van parked opposite the hotel)
PETRIE: Where's Pappas?
LA GUARDIA: Hello, Marcus. He's in the back.
PETRIE: (getting in the van) How's it going?
LA GUARDIA: Boring. Fennady hasn't stirred from his lair. Isbecki?
PETRIE: With Bon Bon. (calling in to the back of the van) I'm sorry Marty, you'll have to stay 'til he gets here.
LA GUARDIA: A little post-prandial hanky panky?
PETRIE: I don't know. But I'm sure he'll tell me all about it. ...In living colours. ...Anybody go in I should know about?
LA GUARDIA: Mr. Fennady isn't exactly a social butterfly. Like I said, 'Boring'.
PETRIE: I guess we should be grateful.

[Manhattan streets]

(fire engines rush to a major fire)

[Detectives' Squad room]

ISBECKI: I am telling you. He did not come out of that front door.
LA GUARDIA: It's the only way out, Victor.
CHRISTINE: (coming in) Good morning.
MARY BETH: Morning men. What's up?
LA GUARDIA: Fennady slipped by Petrie and Isbecki last night.
CHRISTINE: You're kidding?!
ISBECKI: He did. And Coleman's hoiking up the odds on it. It's not fair.
PETRIE: Let it go, Victor. All right?
CHRISTINE: OK, so you lost him.
MARY BETH: It's not the worst day in the world.
ISBECKI: (leaving) No.
LA GUARDIA: There was another fire in the Garment District, last night. The night watchman was critically injured.
COLEMAN: Congratulations ladies. You are now the favourites in the Sergeant's deal. (the duo walks away) Well, what else could I say? I didn't set the fire, I just set the odds.

[Samuels' office]

SAMUELS: (into phone) Six. ...We're covering Seymour's loft and we're trying to increase surveillance on Fennady. ...We lost contact yesterday. ...We're combing the Garment... ...I understand. ...Sir! Two weeks ago I was begging you for surveillance equipment and... ...Yes, Inspector. ...Thank you.
(he rings off)
SAMUELS: Isn't that typical? I couldn't get the Major Cases to take an interest in this case and now they want to yank it back to themselves.
CHRISTINE: Sure.
SAMUELS: It takes a week to set up and now all of a sudden it's the biggest thing since the Son of Sam! ...When's Seymour shipping on his dresses?
MARY BETH: Any day now sir.
SAMUELS: Well, Knelman's given us 'til Friday. Then it goes to Major Cases.
MARY BETH: Yes sir.
CHRISTINE: Thank you, Lieutenant.

[Warehouse yard in Garment District]

(the duo is back in the surveillance van with George. There are parked opposite a large lorry with 'SINGLETON GARMENT TRUCKING INC.' on the side)

[Surveillance van]

MARY BETH: (taking photos) I mean, with all this different bank stuff, and you know, the different rates. I mean, with a fixed rate at thirteen percent and a variable at eleven and a half, the difference is something like a hundred and thirty bucks a month. That's assuming that we put twenty percent down. (Chris yawns) Which is what we planned. But I figure that variables can go to plus fourteen, fourteen and a half. I'm sorry, this must be kind of boring, huh?
CHRISTINE: No! It's nice to see you so excited.
MARY BETH: I tried to tell Harve about all this last night. And he works with numbers every day, but he was having trouble keeping his eyes open. Pretty boring. Right?
GEORGE: Yep.
MARY BETH: I wasn't talking to you! (looking out the window) Oh Lord!

[Warehouse yard in Garment District]

(Mary Beth jumps out of the van)
MARY BETH: Mrs. Seymour! (she shepherds Mrs. Seymour, who is carrying a brown bag, away behind another van) Good to see ya, Ma.
FREYDA SEYMOUR: Seymour was worrying that you should go hungry down here.
MARY BETH: Mrs. Sey...
FREYDA SEYMOUR: I made a couple of sandwiches. I do hope you like it. I took off all the crusts.
MARY BETH: Mrs. Seymour, this is supposed to be an undercover operation...
FREYDA SEYMOUR: You young girls with your diets.
MARY BETH: (trying to get her to leave) Mrs. Seymour, please.
FREYDA SEYMOUR: I heard about your night watchman that got burnt. So did Seymour. So (giving Mary Beth the bag) these keep you well. You should take on a few more pounds. It wouldn't kill you.
MARY BETH: Yes, ma'am. Thank you.

[Surveillance van]

MARY BETH: Ready for this? She made us sandwiches.
CHRISTINE: Well, that's very sweet but she's now compromised the stake out.
MARY BETH: Well, what was I supposed to do? (taking a note out of the bag) From Aaron Seymour. 'I'm shipping the dresses tomorrow. If he's coming, he's coming tonight. No more chicken for the Cossacks.'
CHRISTINE: All right!!!
MARY BETH: What did I tell ya?
CHRISTINE: Kish kish, Mary Beth. The man has kish kish.

[Seymour's new warehouse loft workroom/Warehouse entrance]

(at night the duo are sitting on the floor waiting)
CHRISTINE: (into walkie-talkie) Isbecki?
ISBECKI: (into walkie-talkie) Yeah.
CHRISTINE: (into walkie-talkie) Negative?
ISBECKI: (into walkie-talkie) Negative.

[Manhattan street outside the Hotel Ulster]

(Samuels walks up to the other surveillance van)
LA GUARDIA: Nothing Bert. He hasn't moved.
SAMUELS: It doesn't make sense. If Ashland doesn't send him tonight, it's gonna be too late.
LA GUARDIA: We can see the door. We can see the fire escape. There's no other way out. He's gotta still be there.
SAMUELS: That's what Isbecki said.

[Seymour's new warehouse loft workroom]

MARY BETH: You're not falling asleep on me are you, Chris?
CHRISTINE: No.
MARY BETH: It's four fifty-one. I don't think he'll come.

[Corridor in Hotel Ulster]

(Samuels is accompanied by a uniformed officer)
SAMUELS: (to the manager) Which one of these is it?
(the manager indicates a door)
SAMUELS: (knocking) Fennady! ...Mr. Fennady, are you there?
MANAGER: He could be in Miss. Marr's apartment.
SAMUELS: Who's Miss. Marr. Fennady!
MANAGER: His girl friend, on the other side of the building.
SAMUELS: The other side of the building? Has she got a fire escape?
MANAGER: Of course
SAMUELS: (to the uniformed officer) Get down there. Tell them to get on the radio. Fennady may already be on his way. (to the manager) Open up this door! (pulling the manager by the arm) Come on, damn it, open up this door. I don't wanna have to break the door down . Come on, open it up!

[Warehouse entrance]

(there is a sound)
PETRIE: Did you hear that?
ISBECKI: I didn't hear anything.

[Seymour's new warehouse loft workroom]

(a door is slid open. The duo readies their guns. Fennady is carrying an open briefcase which he puts on the floor)
MARY BETH: Police!
CHRISTINE: Hold it right there! Turn around and put your hands up in the air.
MARY BETH: Come on, Chris.
CHRISTINE: Put your hands up! Right there. ...Get your hands up, I said!! (as she frisks him) Higher!!!
MARY BETH: Who told you to move!!
CHRISTINE: Stand still! Spread.
(Mary Beth takes a glance at the briefcase which is a firebomb with a light flashing)
CHRISTINE: (as she frisks his legs) You have the right to remain silent. If you say anything...
MARY BETH: Christine!!!
(the bomb explodes. Fennady pushes Chris over and escapes. Mary Beth manages to let off a couple of shots)

[Warehouse entrance]

(Petrie and Isbecki spring into action and go up the stairs)

[Seymour's new warehouse loft workroom]

(Chris pushes over a rack of burning garments with a broom, Mary Beth and Chris grab a fire extinguishers and they fight the fire)

[Warehouse staircase]

(Fennady is running down the stairs. He diverts to another staircase when he hears Petrie and Isbecki)

[Seymour's new warehouse loft workroom]

(the duo has the fire extinguished)

[Other warehouse staircase]

(as Fennady descends, Petrie and Isbecki are above him and two other detectives appear below him)
PETRIE: Hold it! Put your hands up, Mr. Fennady! ...High! Where I can see them! And keep them there.

[Lacey's lounge]

(the Laceys' are in their night clothes)
MARY BETH: (coming in) Hey.
HARVEY: Hey kiddo.
MARY BETH: Can't sleep again, huh?
HARVEY: Yeah.
MARY BETH: Have a bad day?
HARVEY: Huh. This job. It's er... I don't know.
MARY BETH: Everybody has a bad day, Harve. (he shakes his head) But you can't keep on with this no sleeping.
HARVEY: I'm not doing anything, Mary Beth. I'm sitting around having lunch with these rich guys in something... I don't know. My stomach... I can't eat. I can't... I'm not... I'm not making something. I'm... You know what I mean. I'm not accomplishing anything.
MARY BETH: Honey, you had a bad day. You can't expect every day to make a big sale.
HARVEY: No, you don't understand. I sold two. ...It isn't enough!
MARY BETH: Why?
HARVEY: You know, back in history when they built all those cathedrals? The workers, they'd carve their names in the stone. It was like signing their work. When I was on the high steel, I saw the indians do that too. They'd scratch their initials on the girders. Even now, when I do a remodel, I put my initials down under something where it doesn't show. Silly, I guess. I don't know. ...I keep thinking. I ...can't take Mike out like I used and point to a building and say 'I built that. My name's on it'. You can't carve your initials in a tax shelter.
MARY BETH: Then you have to quit.
HARVEY: That means no house.
MARY BETH: I know.
HARVEY: I feel terrible.
MARY BETH: Oh, come on Harve, I've been thinking about that house, you know. I mean, what with the interest rates the way they are, it may not be real smart to commit to a long-term mortgage like that. I mean, they're bound to come down eventually, huh?
HARVEY: I know how much this house means to ya.
MARY BETH: We'll do it. It just means it'll take a little longer, that's all.
HARVEY: I got something for ya.
(he gives her a small box which she opens. It has a ring in it)
MARY BETH: It's beautiful, Harve. I can't have that now.
HARVEY: Oh no, we can afford it.
MARY BETH: I really need a new refrigerator.
HARVEY: No. Taking your house away, the least I can give you is a ring.
MARY BETH: Harve, we're gonna get the house! We are. Right? We're just putting it off a little. ...Oh boy! It's beautiful.
HARVEY: You know, it's about time we got engaged. Give me your hand, will ya?
(he slips on the ring)
MARY BETH: Perfect. ...I love this ring. I really love this ring. (she kisses him) I'll tell you what. We'll take this stuff in the kitchen and then we'll go in the bedroom and I will show how much I love this ring.
(Mary Beth goes into the kitchen)
HARVEY: (calling out) Mary Beth!
MARY BETH: (admiring the ring) Hm.
HARVEY: You know, if you want, next Summer we'll repaint. It's about time we found new carpets and drapes. You know we could really fix this place up. You know, all the time I spend doing stuff for everybody else, you'd think I could spend some time doing something here. Right?
MARY BETH: Right.
HARVEY: What do say kiddo, we really do a job on it.
MARY BETH: (quietly) Right.

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